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    A second Act that is worth mentioning is the Chinese Exclusion Act, this was the first time that United States passed a law that would not allow entry to a specific ethnic group in this case from China, Japan or any other Oriental countries. The act was targeting mainly Chinese workers, those who were unskilled and even those who were skilled but, they did make small exceptions with teachers, students, or officials. Middle class Chinese workers first became interested in the United States during…

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    It all begun when I was quite physically, pushed through the birth canal located right here in Berkeley, California. Alta Bates Hospital was where my lovely mother gave birth to a girl. A short period of time following my birth, my family and I relocated across the bridge to San Francisco. The foggy, eccentric city is where I spent, and still spend, my life. I consider myself very lucky to be able to openly identify as a Chinese American girl. Most of this can be attributed to me living…

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    Chinese Exclusion Dbq

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    There are many reasons that the Chinese Exclusion Act was passed in 1882. The Chinese Exclusion Act was an act passed to temporarily prohibit the immigration of the Chinese. In 1892 they extended the the Chinese Exclusion Act, this was known as the Geary Act. The main reason the Chinese Exclusion Act was passed is because of all the chinese immigrants coming from china then filling in jobs were mainly the irish men, and the german men would not work because they did not like the chinese taking…

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    The experiences of Native American compared to immigrants from China in the late 19th century were similar in many ways. The Gold Rush of 1850 started the trend of immigration into the United States from China. The Chinese came to America with the hope of every other immigrant: the search of a new life and opportunity. However, like the Native Americans, the Chinese were ostracized and stigmatized by American (particularly the ones of European descent). One example is the Chinese Exclusion Act,…

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    Maxine Hong Kingston is one of the first-generation Chinese-American citizens because she was born in California at October 27, 1940 as the eldest child to a poor Chinese family who were wishing for better life, so they decides to immigrate and reside in the United States because of starvation in China, in 1924. Kingston father works as a teacher in China, while her mother works as a midwife there. Chen Lok Chua
 records that the first generation of Chinese immigrants have the same version of…

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    Amy Tan Two Kinds Theme

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    I chose to write my research essay on the Chinese immigration and history that is based on the story “Two Kinds” by Amy Tan. The story “Two Kinds” is the result of what happened to the mother during the Communist Revolution in China. The mother moved to San Francisco, after losing everything, in hopes for a new beginning and a better life. Chinese people had been through so much during this time. They held a completely different value of life than Americans. Cultural differences made a huge…

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    SARS Epidemical Analysis

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    SARS, which stands for severe acute respiratory syndrome, is an epidemic that affected people worldwide. Of the 8,098 people that became infected, more than seven hundred died (CDC). The outbreak of SARS initially broke out in Guangdong Province in November of 2002 and was contained in June of 2003. The symptoms of SARS include high fever, headaches, and cough, and is spread by respiratory droplets (Thompson 2014). At the time, leading laboratories could not find an antiviral or antibiotic drug…

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    The spectacular author and civil rights activist, Pearl S. Buck, was born on June 26, 1892, in Hillsboro, West Virginia. She grew up bilingual, knowing both English and Chinese since her mother was from China ("Pearl S. Buck”). She spent ten years of her life living in Nanjing, China. The Chinese in Nanjing were much more influenced by Western ideas than the Northern farmers, and Pearl Buck began to write about the young people's conflicts between the old and new ways of culture ("A Guide to…

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    In The Woman Warrior, Kingston develops the image of The Warrior as a protector, in order to illustrate a connection between being a Warrior in battle, and being a Warrior fighting to protect the Chinese traditions in a place away from home. While Kingston is in America, she feels as if everyone else there who is not a part of her culture is looking from outside a window at them. She feels like the American culture does not accept others, and you must assimilate into their culture in order to…

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    Daughter Of Han

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    When modernization is often discussed in classes, it is usually depicted as a rapid welcomed event of progress for the society involved. However, in “A Daughter of Han” by Ida Pruitt, Ning Lao T’ai-t’ai’s autobiographical account illustrates China’s gradual modernization against its reluctant conservative society. Modernity is defined by the presence of themes such as: industrialization, the increase of global integration, the expansion of political participation, the expansion of mass society,…

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