Yes For Aboriginals Case Study

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On 27 May 1967, 90.77% of Australian voters recorded the largest ever ‘Yes’ vote in a referendum to change the Australian constitution. This referendum finally allowed Aboriginal people to be totalled in the national census in addition to be subject to Commonwealth laws, rather than just state laws. This is known as the source in which will be allayed to determine The reliability to a person studying the background to the struggle if aboriginal and Torres Strait islander peoples for rights and freedoms in 1965 will be listed in the following text giving facts on source A.

When concerning source A; the origin, motive and audience deliver historians with relevant evidence on struggle of aboriginal and Torres Strait islander people’s rights
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She was a crusader for the rights of Indigenous Australians and South Sea Islanders. ‘YES for aboriginals’ is a primary source which means that; in the study of history as an educational retribution, a primary source is an artefact, a document, a recording, or other source of information that was created at the time under study. The source is a political poster therefore it is easily created to was made to persuade people to vote for aboriginal rights and instruct (instructions on how to vote) people, we know this by how it was set out (as a voting sheet). Also, it was …show more content…
The nature of the source is a poster given to people to inform them on how to vote for the aboriginal rights. The source includes a baby girl in the right hand foreground to trigger emotive feelings, and make audiences sympathise with indigenous communities and it appeals to peoples conscious and to a sense of purpose. On the left is bold black writing which says ‘’ yes for aborigines. Write yes for aborigines in the lower square’’ this is to stress how much aboriginals need their rights. The point of view in this source is one sided. ‘Yes for aborigines’ is an example of it going pro aboriginal; on the other hand: it doesn’t show what the anti-aboriginal and Australian government thought about this or what they wanted on the voting poster. The yes in the referendum indicates that they’ve constantly been told no symbolically. Thus, the sources’ content, content historians with applicable information for the struggle of aboriginal and Torres Strait islander peoples privileges and

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