Difference Between Charles Perkins And Eddie Mabo

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Rights and Freedoms

To what extent do Charles Perkins and Eddie Mabo contribute to changes in rights and freedoms for Indigenous Australians?

Charles Perkins and Eddie Mabo made a huge impact on the rights and freedoms of Aboriginals through protests and campaigns. Charles Perkins is an indigenous Australian that took place in the freedom ride organised by a group of Sydney university students which helped to change the rights and freedom laws of indigenous people. Eddie Mabo helped change the rights of Aboriginals through his work in court to change the land rights in Australia.

Charles Perkins made a huge contribution to the way indigenous people were treated.The ride took place on February 1965 and got lots of media coverage in the hopes
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When Australia was discovered it did not have any legal ownership over it so by British law (the law of Terra Nullius) it could be overtaken, but the only problem was that the land was occupied by Aboriginal people before the invasion. The Aboriginal people did not claim the land as their own because they believed they were equal with the earth. The land was very important to the Aboriginals as they have a deep spiritual connection with the land and it was the main source of life. The aboriginal people felt like taking care of the land was there responsibility. Eddie Mabo wanted to change the law of Terra Nullius and claim the Aboriginal people as the original owners of the land this would change social and political views of the aboriginal people. eddie began his Journey on changing the rights by Making a speech at a land rights conference at the James Cook University his speech explained the traditional land owners and the inheritance system that his old community followed on Mer Island. A lawyer that was the audience noticed the significance of His speech and suggested there should be a case to claim land rights through the court system, so that’s exactly what he did. Eddie Murphy and his layer applied successfully for research grants to conduct research for the case. In may 1982 Eddie and fellow Mer Islanders began their legal claim for ownership of their lands on mer island. But Eddie kept pushing for further action to be taken in Australia, this law began known

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