Aboriginal People Reflective Essay

Amazing Essays
I respectfully acknowledge the Elders and custodians of the Yuin nation, past and present, their descendants and kin of the land where I am living, studying and working.
This is a warning that this journal may contain images, voices and names of deceased Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Island people.

Whilst attending school with two Aboriginal students in my class, I was never exposed to people stereotyping Aboriginal people. I lived in an inland rural area of New South Wales, and after finishing school I moved to Kununurra, a northern remote area in Western Australia. This was a place where my knowledge and understanding of the Aboriginal people their culture, history and identity was largely developed. I was exposed to so many dimensions of the different ways they lived, whether it was traditionally in remote communities or within the township. This exposure tested and challenged my thoughts, it lead me to further question some of the reasons why the Aboriginal people had vastly different ways of living. During the 3 years I lived in Kununurra I gained much repect for their culture and
…show more content…
“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures have adapted dramatically to accommodate all that has been introduced into Australia since 1788” as stated by Reconciliation Australia (http://www.shareourpride.org.au/). If people are educated on the journey that the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have encountered throughout their lives, an understanding of the importance of culture and identity to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people would establish. Stereotypical behaviour often occurs from lack of education or knowledge of a culture, and has the ability to change by educating people on the facts, and importance to accept and respect others, and “treat everyone as an individual” (Reconciliation Australia,

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Rudd attempted to construct an imagined community by using words like nation, country, Australians. These are words used repeatedly in his speech. This is important to create a sense of belonging to the nation, as a person in that nation. Throughout his speech, he used words like ‘our nation’, the nation’s history, all Australians, great country. Indigenous Australians, and so on.…

    • 1439 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This way of thinking was common place until the mid-1960s when aboriginal Australians gained citizenship rights (Australian Electoral Commission, 2015). Directly afterwards the Land rights movement begun which focused on the repurposing of land that was originally taken for the aboriginal people. It succeed and many parts of Australia were returned to previous owners. Their relationship with the land is so strong in their culture that they fought first with spear and club and last with word and pen to ensure that the land was respected and therefore their culture persevered (Australia.gov.au, 2015). The inclusion of the Indigenous people and the respect given to their land serve as distinct reminders of how far Australia has…

    • 1025 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Aboriginal Literature

    • 1330 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The Aboriginal literatures are also pertinent to all Aboriginal cultures in Canada and around the world, and even further, they are also pertinent to all peoples universally. Indigenous writing emphasizes commonalities because the writers come from diverse regions, cultures, and histories. What the entire galaxy of Aboriginal writers share is their connections to their homelands, their histories of colonization, genocide, and displacement and their will to survive and pass the treasures of their cultures to future generations. In order to address some of the challenges on the road to Aboriginal literatures published in English, the teachers, the researchers, and the students may discuss the well-known poem “I Lost My Talk” by Rita Joe. This text may be taught either in a specific Mi’kmaq context or as an introduction to Aboriginal writing, as the points about loss of language/culture/identity and voice in residential schools pertains to all indigenous cultures in Canada.…

    • 1330 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Aboriginal People Analysis

    • 1764 Words
    • 8 Pages

    This unit enabled me to explore the history of relationships between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in Australia. More precisely, the unit is an eye-opener to understand the dispossession, resistance, adaptation and survival of indigenous people in Australia followed by the British colonization. I heard that the indigenous people were bush tuckers and lived in bushes. However, I do not have much idea about their history, lifestyle and culture before I learn this unit. I am really admired by the knowledge that the indigenous people followed a lot of fundamentals principles in their life.…

    • 1764 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    During primary school we learnt some of the Dream Time stories and the their different ways of living. However, not until high school did we learn what truly happened to Aboriginals. We watched eye-opening movies such as ‘The Rabbit Proof Fence’ that started more questions about the aboriginal culture, why they were treated so badly and what is different about it today. This just shows how ignorant I have lived regards to the knowledge of indigenous culture. Coming into this course I had little understanding of what I was expecting, as it was a core subject and I was required to attended I didn’t read the subject description or details before attending the first lecture.…

    • 1573 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    1.a) Please document your feeling on commencement of this unit, and at the conclusion of this unit. Reflections should include: · What are your expectations about the unit before starting? Prior to the commencement of this unit I expect to learn more about Indigenous culture and the hardships they faced due to European settlement. I am hoping to find out how life was like before the European settlement and how the settlement effected not only Indigenous people but also their land. Incompletion of this unit I would like to know if some of aspects of Indigenous culture was taken and blended to the main stream Australian culture we have today.…

    • 2114 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Important Role of Occupational Therapy within First Australian Communities Introduction Occupational therapists enable people to engage in everyday activities through occupation, which can structure, shape and change people’s lives. Correspondingly, attitudes, values, perceptions and life choices can be shaped by culture (Kinébanian& Stomph, 2010). However, there is inconsistency in the provision of occupational therapy services to clients from different cultures (Darawsheh, Chard & Eklund, 2015). In Australia, there are two Indigenous cultures as part of the Australian nation – Aboriginals and Torres Straight Islanders. For the purpose of this paper they will be referred to as First Australians.…

    • 1170 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are today acknowledged as the owners and custodians of this land we call home, but unfortunately, they have experienced situations that have completely disregarded their basic human rights before they received their rightful title. This essay will look at the history/ background of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in regards to their rights within Australia, analyse certain ethical issues that have occurred when dealing with their rights, outline the legislation and policies that form the basis for their rights and discuss current issues that Indigenous people face today referring to their rights and the justice system. The first settlement was in 1788; Governor Phillip was in charge…

    • 1401 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Cultural Experience Essay

    • 1939 Words
    • 8 Pages

    It 's a necessity to draw a connection to the past and present, not only when discussing our own history and culture but the culture of the Indigenous people who were here before us. The reason for this is that not only if we understand their culture can we, as a species, improve, but it 'll also give us a firm understanding of a culture that was severely damaged by years of prejudice and hate, looking at this is something that will allow us a species to move forward. The site I chose to visit was at the Melbourne Museum, an Aboriginal Centre called Bunjilaka; the first thing a visitor will see is a sign that says “We welcome you to Victoria. We invite you to share in our culture and stories; to listen and to learn from the first peoples…

    • 1939 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    However, the Government has seemed blind for a long time about the Aboriginal issues. It is time to face the reality, and do justice and recognise Aboriginal people in the constitution. It should be a move forward to evolve as society. The public intellectual has written a lot a books and essays that give better ideas about the Aboriginal issues. One book is ‘Radical Hope’ where he claims that with education is possible to transform children that live in disadvantages and the importance the keep their culture.…

    • 1501 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays