Critical Reflective Journal: Darug Country

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Critical Reflective Journal

I would like to acknowledge the Dharug (also called, Darug, Daruk, Dharuk and Dharruk) people who are the traditional custodians of the land where I live, work, study and was born. I would also like to pay my profoundest respect to all Elders both past and present of Dharug Country. Furthermore, would like to express my deepest sympathy and am sincerely sorry for all historical mistakes by past governments and policies (Creative Spirits, 2017).

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were living happily on the land before 1788 and an Acknowledgement of Country ceremony demonstrates respect for all Indigenous people, Elders, past and present. Teaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children involves
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Furthermore, believe governments, politicians and teachers need to make more of an effort in mending relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. This can be done by focussing on revealing the truth and removing negative myths. I will teach children that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are the First Australians and the First Fleet did not discover Australia (Harrison & Sellwood, 2016). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture should be integrated in all learning areas of the Australian Curriculum because it is the culture of Country. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have an intimate relationship with the land, sky and sea taking only what they need, plus follow an environmentally friendly philosophy (SBS OnDemand, 2014d). Yunkaporta’s eight ways of learning Aboriginal language in schools will help me create lessons and provide me with appropriate pedagogy skills suitable to teach Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in the classroom (Yunkaporta, 2009). Developing new knowledge will occur when the land, body, mind and spirit flows through meaningful learning activities. Sharing stories, making maps, non-verbal listening, drawing symbols and images, land links, a non-linear process, …show more content…
I will not be shy to ask for assistance in gaining a deeper understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture, routines or practices and work in partnership with Aboriginal Education Officers (Echo360, 2010). AITSL Standard 1.4 recommends graduate teachers develop strategies for teaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children (AITSL, 2014). Teachers working with Aboriginal children strictly caution against strategies, such as, student centred learning that focus on passive learning environments, questioning student’s competence and independent learning (Echo360, 2010a). Suitable teaching strategies include co-operative learning practices that involve small, large or whole group activities, constructive feedback that does not shame or distress students in an active learning environment (Harrison & Sellwood, 2016). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children learn through social practice, concrete learning experiences and practical hands-on activities (Harrison & Sellwood, 2016). Therefore, an outside classroom learning environment is favourable because students become more actively engaged with the land through activities, such as, swimming and the bush (Echo360, 2010a). Some families experience hardship, such as, poverty, addiction, health, violence, homelessness, unemployment, remoteness and imprisonment that prevent, hinder or restrict

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