Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islanders Essay

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In Australian history the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders of Australia were not treated with the respect and dignity that they deserve, they have been the protectors of this land for many years before British colonised here, they lived from the land and they had a very strong community based life. After years of demoralising them and taking their basic ways of life away from them, we now have certain policies and procedures in place to bring the equality back. From the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Health Plan 2013-2023 the government is committed to improving health and wellbeing through closing the gap in health outcomes with the wider Australian population.
In the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Health
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There are many things that can affect this. Social support can have a large impact on maternal health and parenting according to the Solid Facts friendship, good social relations and strong supportive networks improve health at home, at work and in the community. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are very community based, promoting culturally appropriate maternal health services as close to the communities as possible is going to have a positive effect on the mothers and their …show more content…
When the plan was released it was with the understand and knowledge that there was not going to be a quick fix to this problem it will require implementing many different strategies and changing perception and reaction of generations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. Strategies such as addressing issues that are politically and socially challenging such as sexual health or strategies to address violence, self-harm and abuse, also strategies like provide an organising framework of health conditions that coordinate activities across primary care, specialist services and other non-health services, such as eye health, ear health, oral health and injury control. If we can put this strategies into place and implement them then over time we will see that we can close the gap this is the best

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