Contemporary First People's Health Outcomes

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The purpose of this paper is to critically analyse the impact of history and colonisation on contemporary First People’s health outcomes. It will also analyse how these impacts influenced Australia’s First Peoples ability to build trustful and respectful relationships within the healthcare system. It will commence by explaining the policy era of colonisation and how this era impacted on health. This will then lead into strength-based approaches that healthcare professionals can use to build trustful and respectful relationships. This paper will then introduce the assimilation policy and how this era impacted on health outcomes. Finally, it will conclude by critically analysing which strength-based approach will be best suited to improve these …show more content…
But not all can understand Indigenous disadvantage is a result of the nations history of colonisation over 60,000 years ago (Behrendt, 2012). The most immediate consequence of the colonisation was a wave of epidemic diseases including small pox, measles, sexually transmitted diseases and influenza that spread and destroyed many Indigenous communities (Harris, 2013). This era is evident as to why many Indigenous people don’t trust and therefore don’t use mainstream health care services today, because they don’t feel safe from racism, being stereotyped, as well as the Western approach to healthcare, ‘it can feel alienating and intimidating’ (Narine, 2013). A sterile hospital environment conjures up many memories of racism and mistreatment (Reading and Wien, 2009). Some fear they will never leave a hospital alive, many believe ‘hospital is code word for the place you go die’ (Reading and Wien, 2009) This is one of various reasons as to why many Indigenous people are less likely to seek help and rather be diagnosed at a later stage of disease; this can delay treatment (Narine, 2013). In addition, as non-Indigenous Australians, identifying strength based approaches that can be used in a an individual or community setting will allow trustful and respectful relationships with Indigenous people to come seek help …show more content…
For Indigenous people culture plays an important role in identity, it is passed along from generation to generation. Learning about Indigenous peoples culture can help us better understand each other. This is really important for building trustful and respectful relationship. Taking an interest in Indigenous culture can show that we value what 's important to Indigenous people, and can improve the way we see the world (Digital, 2015). A healthcare system free of racism and judgment is a key social determinant of health and can lead to positive health outcomes for Indigenous people (Commonwealth of Australia, 2013). Statistics show that Indigenous people who experience racism and discrimination in a healthcare setting are less likely to access, engage or comply with treatment (Awofeso, 2011). If healthcare practitioners are better educated in the history and colonization it will help change our perception of Indigenous people and be more willing to assist them by providing accessible healthcare. This can be achieved by providing healthcare workers with access to Indigenous cultural education and training opportunities. Training will increase the understanding of the cultural and historic reasons why Indigenous

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