The Importance Of An Implied Duty

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An implied duty is one which pits any type of entity with an obligation do something based on ethical or moral reasons. It is the duty of a parent to take care of their children as much as it is the obligation of the police officer to help those who are in need. These are implied tasks that have either been developed over the years or have always been the way that it has worked. The issue of worker rights and wages has evolved gradually over time to where we are today; in that there are many pieces of legislation providing workers in the United States with access to a minimum wage, safe working environment and a slew of other benefits. The intent of these laws is to protect workers from the potential malfeasance of corporations. With these …show more content…
No one is ever satisfied with the amount that they make and always would like to make more. The issue with wages is that it is determined by a supply and demand system. If there are many workers, but few jobs, employers realize that employees are lucky to even land a job and can afford to pay them less. If there are many jobs, but few employees, employers provide incentives to the few job seekers on the market. This is the type of system overseas when it comes to US companies employing local workers. There are many workers and only few jobs, so these companies do not have the incentive to provide higher wages. They know that if someone is dissatisfied with the job and leaves because of the money, they can hire someone else relatively …show more content…
Companies in the United States want cheap labor to increase their profit margins with the possibility of investing it into domestic and foreign infrastructure. The workers then have a job in which they make considerably more than in their local economy. The disparity lies in the safety conditions of these workers. An argument for these workers is that businesses have an ethical duty to impose certain safety procedures. While any moral person can agree, the variation lies in how far do these safety procedures need to go. At some time, there is a point where the cost of increasing safety precautions outweighs the cost of even using foreign workers. The balance that must be struck is between keeping the needs of each of the two parties. Companies want to keep foreign labor because of how cheap it is. Once it does not become cheap anymore, the incentive of outsourcing goes away. Local workers want the factories to exist because they provide a higher pay on average than many local jobs, but the conditions are often less than ideal. From a moral perspective, these workers have a right to safe working conditions and should be able to have decent wages relative to local economy. However, Ian Maitland argues those conditions cannot be accomplished while still providing the incentives of businesses to operate in those countries. The

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