Wichita Facility Essay

1478 Words Nov 26th, 2012 6 Pages
 Where would you place the Wichita change initiative on all four dimensions of change initiatives described in the reading Organizational Change: An Overview (i.e., scope, source, pacing, and process)?

Scope of change: the scope of change involves aspects such as “how work is done and by whom, who makes decisions and controls resources, what activities and resources have status and value, what the company should be and how it should be seen (Ancona, et. al., 2005, p. M8-15).” Scope can be either radical which involves fundamental changes in the organization or incremental, which are local. In this case, the Wichita change was incremental, meaning that all changes were done at the local level, specific to the needs of the Wichita
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Having Keller’s assistance gave great insight into what mattered to employees and what steps could be taken to meet those needs.

A third reason for the success is the bottom-up management and involvement of employees at all levels of the change initiative. In this case, team-building was important to the employees, and the softball games became a big success. However, instead of implementing this outright, Jimenez and Keller observed that this was what the employees wanted, and facilitated this type of program.

 Where would you place the Lubbock change initiative on all four dimensions of change initiatives described in the reading Organizational Change: An Overview (i.e., scope, source, pacing, and process)?

The Lubbock initiative was mirrored to the Wichita change, but was different in its four dimensions of change. In this case, the scope of change was radical, as the organization was making changes at the general level rather than instituting local changes to Lubbock based on unique factors. The pacing dimension in this case was punctuated. Whereas in Wichita, Jimenez had no defined end date, with Lubbock, the team had given itself a timeline by trying to complete the change in less time than they had in Wichita, without fully analyzing the uniqueness of Lubbock needs. The source of change in Lubbock was top-down, with the organization driving all of the initiatives from top management. In Wichita, the employees drove the

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