Why We Fight: The First World War

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Why We Fight

On December 7th of 1941, an attack on Pearl Harbor that was just the beginning of America’s involvement in World War II. The propaganda film, Why We Fight, shows many examples that lead up to this attack. The film explains the rise of Nazis and how wide spread they were becoming, along with the invasion of Manchuria by the Japanese. It also includes other motivations as to why America needed to be included in this war between other countries. The Neutrality Act helped Woodrow Wilson avoid the First World War as long as he could whereas refrained Franklin Roosevelt from being able to enter the war sooner. With the film, Why We Fight, the United States was able to recruit more men for the military. It was also used to show the
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During the First World War, to avoid being pulled into war, America enacted the first Neutrality Act which prohibited the selling of arms and ammunition to foreign nations. With this act, Woodrow Wilson was able to stay under the radar for the beginning of the First World War, but in the end was forced to fight. Many American’s were against Wilson’s stance on neutrality. They recalled the French assistance in the American Revolution, along with sympathizing with Britain because of many cultural similarities. Britain also controlled a powerful fleet which had set up an economic blockade of Germany. Because trade no longer existed with Germany at the time, war-related goods escalated greatly which would be able to pull America’s economy out of their current dilemma. Roosevelt, on the other hand, wanted to be included in the war. With the United States still trying to climb out of the depression, he wanted to protect his investments he had with Britain. One part of the Neutrality Act of 1937, allowed nations to acquire any items by having them pay and carry them away. Although later in 1939, a new Neutrality Act was passed that lifted the arms embargo and put all trade to the terms of “cash-and-carry”. Roosevelt was also able to help aid Britain with the Lend-Lease Act. This act allowed the British to obtain arms and ammunition form America without paying but instead on credit. This credit was to be …show more content…
It does not just include films anymore. Now, people have access to information at their fingertips. With all this technology, it allows people to spread information quickly to large mass groups and can influence a whole nation. Unfortunately, American people are very susceptible to the media propaganda. Many people want their information quick and to move on to the next topic. Candidates have used commercials to bring down their opposing candidate. All news channels touch on a story quickly and move on to the next. It is up to the people to investigate deeper into those candidates or event. Just prior to the war, many American’s may had argued as to why their country was considering to involve their selves into a gruesome war. But they soon experience that it was necessary to protect the future of not just the United States, but those of their allies. Germany was reining in fast with trying to control the whole eastern hemisphere. America had to act quickly to help aid their allies and protect their investments they had abroad. Japan attacking Pearl Harbor was just that little push Franklin Roosevelt needed to get support behind involving the United States in the Second World

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