How Did The War Affect The Economy

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It is surprising how wars have a way of improving the economy rather than completely destroying it. The Great Depression was a global economic crisis that began from the market crash in 1929. It is known to be the most major economic event in history. However, as wars were being fought, the economy was improving. The coming of World War II brought an end to the economic problems of the Great Depression by providing new jobs, technologies, and opportunities.

During the Great Depression, there were many economic problems, such as decrease in industrial production. The construction of new industrial plants fell by more than 90%. Production of automobiles also dropped down by two-thirds. In addition, steel plants operated at only 12% capacity. All in all, industrial production fell by more than 50%.

As industrial production was decreasing, unemployment sprung up and was increasing greatly. More than thirteen million people in America lost their jobs. At least 62% of the people were out of work for more than a year, unable to provide for their families. This led to men leaving their families to find work elsewhere, as well as boys being forced to search for jobs as early as the age of 12. As these problems were in effect, a war was starting that would soon change everything.
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This war was later known as “World War II.” There were many causes to the war, including the Italian fascism in the 1920s, the Japanese invasions of China in the 1930s, and most importantly, the political takeover by Hitler and the Nazi Party in 1933. However, none of this affected America until the Japanese attacked on Pearl Harbor. After this horrific event, America declared war on Japan. After four years of involvement in the war, America was showing great improvement in

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