Why Did The Franks Lose The Battle Of Hattin?

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Why did the Franks lose the Battle of Hattin? The Battle of Hattin occurred on July 4, 1187. The Battle was between the Ayyubid Dynasty led by Sultan Saladin that was determined to retake the Holy lands in the name of Sunni Islam and Frankish Crusaders led by recently crowned King Guy of Lusignan that were attempting to defend the Principality of Galilee. The battle occurred after Saladin’s army crossed into Galilee and besieged the city of Tiberias on July 2 1187, the Franks marched to relieve the siege and defeat the Saracen army. It can be suggested that the failure of the Frankish army at the Battle of Hattin marked the end of the Frankish Kingdom in the Holy Land which had existed for eighty-eight years , though some resisted long after …show more content…
July 2 1187 the Frankish army was camped at Saforie, the size of the army is debatable as Phillips maintains the army had around 16,300 in total whereas Baldwin asserts that the crusader army was closer to 20,000 and near equal to the Saracen army .King Guy received advice from Count Raymond as Tiberias was his holding and he knew the land best. The king was advised to let Tiberias go as the Count believed that Saladin did not plan on keeping the city just plundering it and removing its defences before returning to their own kingdom. The count advised the King to also make attempt no attack on Saladin’s army , this was the same advice Raymond gave four years earlier to Guy that led to his removal as regent by Baldwin IV. The Count had reason for keeping the army in Saforie as he knew that the march between Saforie and Tiberias was waterless country and therefore they could not maintain the army in the dry climate. It is clear from the fact he was willing to sacrifice his own holding and allow his wife and men to be captured that Raymond was attempting to save the Kingdom and that by offering battle in an area without the right environment would lead to the decimation of the Franks. The King was willing to accept this advice which was also accepted by the Barons, however Gerard de Ridefort entered the kings tent that night and pressured the king to attack the Saracen army. Gerard was a strong ally of Guy’s and had helped him become king, Smail suggests the King believed that if he did not acquiesce to Gerard then he would no longer be able to count on the support of the Templars. Gerard had a personal vendetta against Raymond due to the Count reneging on a deal to allow Ridefort to marry an heiress under his guardianship. This hatred Gerard held for Raymond led to him discrediting Raymond to the king as he persuaded him that the advice was just another

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