Why Did The English Lose The Hundred Years War

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The Hundred Years War was a series of battles between England and France in the period of 1337-1453. It’s one of the largest conflicts in medieval history. The War had influenced these two country’s political system, economic development and initiated the rose of nationalism. In this essay, I’m going to focus on why and how did the English finally lose the Hundred Years War.

In fact, the English was not always inferior throughout the century. They used to have advantages in different periods. The War can be divided into 4 periods: 1337-1360, 1369-1389, 1415-1429 and 1429-1453. Each period was separated by armistice and short time of peace, although it’s very fragile. In these four period of time, both English and French had two times to be the dominating side. However, the English lose at the end. In my opinion, the English should blame themselves for not guarding the fruits of the victory.
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Joan of Arc was a French woman born in 1412. When she was 16, she claimed she received ‘God’s revelation’ to recapture the lands from the English. She was trusted by Charles VI and got part of the military power. Under her leadership, the French renounced the prudent war tactics. They organized a series of attack and got satisfied result. Les Tourelles was free again after 209 days of siege, also with victories on Jargeau, Meung-sur-Loire and Beaugency. However, she was held captive by Burgundian in a small conflict. They sent Joan to the English. After an unfair adjudgement, she was convicted and burned in Rouen in 1431. This raged the army and citizen of France, and there’s high morale between them. At the same time Philip III (Duke of Burgundy) turned to support the king of France. After a period of truce, the French restarted the war. They had retaken Rouen in 1449 and captured Bordeaux in 1451. The luck of English depleted in the Battle of Castillon, and finally lose the

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