Why Did Sol Chin-Yong Refuse To Change His Name

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In the reading The Clan Records, why did Sol Chin-yong refuse to change his name? What were the consequences of his refusal?
Sol Chin-Yong was an out and out pro-Japanese and had even helped the Japanese army out by giving them rice. Despite his pro-Japanese values he was reluctant to change his name because of his long and illustrious lineage, which led him to believe that by changing his name he would be disrespecting his ancestors and ending the Sol clan. As he was an influential member of the society, government officials were constantly sent to try and persuade him to change his name, but these attempts proved to be futile. Sol Chin-Yong’s case was deemed delicate and hence, it was decided that the governor should see him personally. But even the governor’s effort led to
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They were forced to change their names and even leave the Korean language. During the early period of Japanese colonial administration, freedom of expression and any political rights were continuously denied to the Koreans. Even peaceful protestors were attacked by the Japanese controlled police. Newspapers, rallied to the cause of Korean independence were forced to close by Japanese censorship. Japan was expanding its territories and was involved in constant conflicts with Russia, Koreans were now used as soldiers in Japan’s wars, they were forced to work in Japanese factories and mines, and were required to pay taxes without many benefits. The old feudal system was abolished by the Japanese with which it had put to bed several social evils, women now had more rights, concubinage was now abolished and women had the right to petition for divorce. But, a new problem had surfaced during the 2nd world war, thousands of women were abducted and forced to become “comfort women” (prostitutes) for Japanese

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