Sakhalin And Their Repatriation By Choi Ki-Young: Article Analysis

Good Essays
In Choi Ki-young’s article “Forced Migration of Koreans to Sakhalin and Their Repatriation,” he argues that Sakhalin Korean were put in an awkward position that they were forced to leave their hometown to settle down in Sakhalin as soldiers, workers and comfort women under the colonization of Imperial Japan, but both Japanese government and South Korean government did not make obligated efforts to the repatriation of Sakhalin Korean to South Korea while Soviet government presented indifferent attitude towards this issue after the war between Imperial Japan and Soviet government. And he also described in his article how Sakhalin Korean activists made contribution to influence the international position of Sakhalin Koreans and it ultimately turned …show more content…
Japan did not intend to repatriate colonized Sakhalin Koreans to South Korea or the territory of Japan, but only Japanese people with Japanese nationalities. On the other side, Soviet government did not want to lose the gift from war, they thought the Sakhalin Korean meant cheap labor force. They wanted to recover their economy as soon as it could through the production, they declared a law in order to legalize Sakhalin Koreans’ identities as their human capitals. According to Choi’s article, “anyone residing within Soviet territory that is not a ……to ban the repatriation of Koreans in Sakhalin.” (Choi, 118) The author thinks the Soviet government revealed “a passive and lukewarm attitude toward the matter” in the introduction of this article as part of his argument. (Choi, 111) I agree with how the author sees about remaining Sakhalin Koreans in Russian territory. The Soviet government seemed passively announced the law in order to naturalize Sakhalin Koreans because they could not let them freely consume their natural resources without paying anything as return. And Sakhalin Koreans meant cheap labor force to the Soviet government since they already lost their labor force during the …show more content…
For example, Japanese government claimed an exception for Sakhalin Korean men if they married Japanese women, they were eligible to participate the repatriation of Japanese to Japan. Additionally, the North Korean government also allowed Sakhalin Koreans to join North Korean nationalities. If these Sakhalin made decision to accept either offers, it would made their way easier to back to South Korea. However, the statistics in the article illustrates that “ about 28,000 obtained North Korean citizenship.” (Choi, 120) This indicates that the reason why Sakhalin insisted to stay in Russian territory was based on individual willingness. It is contradicted to author’s point of view that he thinks Sakhalin performed passive to stay in Russian

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Because of the mistrust this idea embedded, further discussions were impaired, making the Japanese accredit any unwillingness to agree an intent “to go to war” (Iriye 32). The blame for this apprehension cannot be laid solely on United States policy of foreign aid, however, as Wang Xi noted in his essay China and U.S.-Japanese Relations that the Japanese could not agree amongst themselves on major issues (Iriye 191). Throughout the negotiations, Japan held that they wanted to enter into peace talks with China and yet did not want to give up their stance as overlord. This put undue strain on the…

    • 800 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    South Korea Essay

    • 1953 Words
    • 8 Pages

    However, this policy of isolation meant that Korea would fell behind other countries in industry and tech. [1] Some attempted to bring new ideas allowing for the assimilation of western technology under eastern ideals; but the conservative nature of Confucianism prevented sudden, large changes. In 1876 merchants from Japan began trading in Busan, and forced the Koreans to sign a treaty of trade and friendship; despite the fact the treaty considered Japan and Korea independent from each other, Japan was obviously the one in control. In 1882 Korea and the SA signed a similar treaty, with treaties for Britain, Germany, Russia and France in the following years. [1] In 1882 some soldiers revolted, causing the burning of Japanese property and the death of Japanese citizens.…

    • 1953 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This is because the international state and non-combative military seem contradictory to Katzenstein and Okawara’s argument. Katzenstien and Okawara could not predict the SDF could evolve into a force for good. Deploying soldiers for humanitarian development and relief purposes was unprecedented. Once communist tension was gone, soldiers could be deployed for humanitarian work without the risk of seeming threatening or challenging. The result of new international stimulus required Japan to be more active in the post cold war era and so Japan adapted the SDF to be a more useful tool that also adhered to the comprehensive definition of defense the constructivists themselves used.…

    • 913 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    To cover up America’s mistakes, he mentioned that when Americans at Pearl Harbor saw Japanese ships on the radar, Japan was trying to convince America that they wanted peace. There is no reason that so many Japanese ships would be traveling to America for peace, the people at Pearl Harbor knew there was going to be an attack. The people at Pearl Harbor knew about the attack because they had radars and saw the Japanese ships on the radars. He also left out that America broke the Japanese diplomatic code and that is why America was attacked . Another important omission of speech was European attacks.…

    • 1324 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    They wanted to thrive as a traditional nation without any influence from the west, but centuries later, when asked to open ports by westerners, “China welcomed foreign trade” for the reason that they benefitted from the silver income that Britain provided. They took Britain’s silver, but did not take Britain’s new ideas and innovations for technology whereas when Japan was confronted by western powers, they wanted to replicate the technology so they could modernize. The Japanese were intrigued by the new innovations and began industrializing. China looked at the new western technology as if they were toys and decided not to industrialize neither did they make reforms. The Chinese had the capacity to industrialize, but they chose not to because they believed they were still the greatest power in the world.…

    • 1226 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    No-No Boy Analysis

    • 1073 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Anything but a Japanese” (Okada 147), this suggestion is one of rebellion against the government and even betterment. Kenji feels as though if Ichiro is able to legally extricate himself from the Japanese community, and join with a person who is not of Japanese descent, then he will also free himself from the harsh social treatment thrust upon those who are Japanese. The fact that Kenji says to ‘marry’ someone is an important part of this dialogue. The closest this story gets to a marriage, a coming together of two people, though of the same race and ethnicity, is when Ichiro and Emi have sex. Emi being Japanese, Ichiro is not directly rebelling against society forced oppression on him.…

    • 1073 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Three questions and answers from A Troubled Peace US-East Asia relations (2016 Spring) Dong il, KIM 1. What are the reasons of the U.S.’s agreement with Japan’s occupation of Korea in the 1900s? → First, the U.S. had no vital military and diplomatic interests in Korea at that time. Even in the aspect of economics and commerce, Korea was not important compare to China and Japan. (p.15) Second, the U.S. disappointed with the deterioration situation in Korea, such as corrupt and incompetent bureaucrats, and even believed Koreans could not govern themselves.…

    • 949 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Harry S Truman Background

    • 1171 Words
    • 5 Pages

    While the Russian forces could have easily taken full control of the whole of Korea, they had chosen to halt at the 38th parallel to honor their agreement. However, this sense commodore was short lived as the allies that were once able to work together became bitter at each other, later making them Cold War enemies. Korea at this point was already partitioned at the 38th parallel, the USSR supported a communist regime in the region they had under their administration and the Americans supported a non-communist regime South of the parallel. Both the United States and the USSR could not agree on the form of government Korea should be, and so the 38th parallel that was meant to be temporary became permanent. In the North, with Soviet assistance, Kim Il Sung began organizing an authoritarian Communist regime.…

    • 1171 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Chiang Kai-Shek Movement

    • 1179 Words
    • 5 Pages

    After World War I the League of Nations was created to help improve international diplomacy between the various nations and to avoid violence and war. However, the League of Nations proved to be weak and unable to restrict the actions of Japan against the Chinese and the takeover of Manchuria. With no international check on Japan and China still weak and split between the Nationalist and Communist they continued to push south. Many Chinese were upset with the Japanese and their aggressive actions against their homelands. However, they were also dissatisfied with the Nationalist government as it seemed like nothing was being done to stop Japan for gaining control of China.…

    • 1179 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Once America achieved this goal by recapturing Seoul, the capital of South Korea, they began to negotiate an armistice with North Korea, under the guidance of Mao Zedong, allowing the end of the war, without it being viewed as a loss in other 'free ' nations. As opposed to in Korea, America was more reluctant to enter a ground war in Vietnam. Despite this, they still did so to support their French allies who were losing the war against the Viet Minh. Representing a change in ideology as seen in the Korean war; however,…

    • 1074 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays