Why Are Women's Suffrage Important Today

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Today, we take women's suffrage for granted, but back in the 1800's and 1900's it was a big deal. People like Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton fought their whole lives for the vote, but they never lived to see it happen. The two made petitions and stood up for what they believed in, and now women today can thank them for helping them get the right to vote.

The fight for women's suffrage began in the early decades before the Civil War. Women were outraged over the fact that men had more rights than women, so many people decided to take a stand. In 1848, a group of mostly girls but some boys gathered in Seneca Falls, New York to discuss all the problems within women's rights. For example, "Most of the delegates agreed: American
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Many of the things that women do now could not be done if the 19th amendment had not of been passed. For example, "The 19th Amendment played a pivotal role in promoting reproductive rights for women, ushering in a new voting population with a political agenda that would ultimately legalize contraception and abortion. Women also experienced economic progress as a result, with the increased availability of family-planning services and supplies allowing more women to enroll in higher education and enter professional occupations" (Americanprogress.org). The main impact that came from the 19th amendment is letting women get a choice when it comes to voting. The votes wouldn't be as equal if women were not voting too. Their opinions count in the long run. Also, women would not have as high of education standards. Before the 19th amendment women were just trained to do all the work that needed to be done in the house. It has changed our lives, because women can not be treated like maids unless that is how they want to be treated. It has convinced men that they should have equal amounts of rights with women. An example of how woman suffrage has changed our life, is Susan B. Anthony's story. Since Susan B. Anthony was thirty years old, she had always believed that women deserved equal right with men. So one day she took a stand. She decided to make a group called the New York State Woman's Rights …show more content…
If it weren't for the people who fought and petitioned for it, women today would most likely not have the right to vote. So before people start taking the law for granted, make sure they realize how much it has changed our lives. Women now can think all the strong people for helping them get the right to vote and be somewhat equal with

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