Argumentative Essay On Women's Suffrage

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“I raise up my voice-not so I can shout but so that those without a voice can be heard...we cannot succeed when half of us are held back,” (Malala Yousafzai).
Women’s suffrage has been an issue that has awakened many people. One way or the other this movement has affected everyone. Societies often view women as weak, worthless, non- essential, but if it wasn’t for woman then we wouldn’t be here today. Women’s abilities are far beyond what we labeled them to be. But societies portrayed women as this robotic figure that always needs to be told what to do. We believe that they shouldn’t have the ability to, have any say of their own. Women’s Suffrage has been a movement where we were able to witness the extent women fought for their rights. The women’s suffrage movement “was the
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and Britain—formed organizations to fight for suffrage,” (Historynet). Many educated, renowned, established successful women was denied the right to vote because of their sex. But women fought this political campaign for which lasted more than 72 years.
In 1890’s the term Feminism was created to give women their rights. Feminism was used to describe a “political, cultural or economic movement aimed at establishing equal rights and legal protection for women…Feminism involves political and sociological theories and philosophies concerned with issues of gender difference, as well as a movement that advocates gender equality for women and campaigns for women 's rights and interests.” This term created a balance in gender equality.
Freedom for Women by Carol Giardina presents a history of the women’s liberation and also the collective feminist’s activity that had occurred years ago. Women have taken many different approaches in recovering from the women’s suffrage. There were many movements, activities which supported the women’s suffrage. Freedom for women Giardina shows us the several activities that occurred. One

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