Woodrow Wilson Women's Suffrage

Better Essays
I first chose the topic of women’s right because, as a young woman in 2016 attending college in the United States, women’s rights are fairly important to me. As I began to look into the topic that I already knew was large and complicated, I decided to hone in on suffrage because I realized it was a pivotal point in the fight for women’s rights and I knew basically nothing about it. This sparked my interest and as I researched I became more and more intrigued and gained an even greater respect for these women who began the discussion of obtaining the rights I enjoy every day.
Women’s Suffrage in the United States took place between the 1848 and August 1920 (Loveday). Although women’s suffrage was going on in other parts of the world for many
…show more content…
Wilson was in inaugurated in 1913 and served as president of the United States until 1921. Alice Paul targeted Wilson in her efforts towards women’s rights she believed (due to her political science background) that even though the president has very little control over laws and amendments that he could control congress through way of his political party which was democratic. “Alice Paul and 300 supporters met with President Wilson on Jan. 9, 1917, expecting that the president would have a plan for winning Congressional approval of the 19th Amendment.” (Sobieski) Wilson ignored the NWP for as long as he could even though they would mock his words by repeating his words on democracy from war and election …show more content…
Senate in 1922 to fill a temporary vacancy for Georgia. She was the first woman senator, and she served for only two days. Many other women followed in the footsteps, in 1925 Nellie Tayloe Ross was elected as the governor of Wyoming (although it was in the succession of her deceased husband) and days later Miriam Amanda Ferguson was elected in Texas. Now we are faced with a new opportunity, and that is to have our first women president in Hilary Clinton. Many women and men alike have expressed the need to vote for her on the fact that she is a woman because of the struggles women have and continue to face. Now personally I’m not sure I believe in electing our president on the case of their gender just for feminist sake, although I could only stand to benefit from the rights I would be sure to continue to hold. Without suffrage and women’s rights activists throughout the years I cannot say whether or not any of the previously mentioned things would have happen or not. To be completely honest I think no matter when suffrage happened it would have happened either way. This isn’t something like clashing beliefs of nations far off, this is women and men and the need to be treated equally. I believe that this is something that had to happen and is clearly something with which only evolves and never seems to fully be

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Today, we take women's suffrage for granted, but back in the 1800's and 1900's it was a big deal. People like Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton fought their whole lives for the vote, but they never lived to see it happen. The two made petitions and stood up for what they believed in, and now women today can thank them for helping them get the right to vote. The fight for women's suffrage began in the early decades before the Civil War. Women were outraged over the fact that men had more rights than women, so many people decided to take a stand.…

    • 830 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women's Suffrage Essay

    • 626 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Prior to the group being founded, women’s suffrage was considered a preposterous idea but thanks to determination and courage of the NAWSA this notion began to crumble. Under the leadership of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, the NAWSA launched state level political and social campaigns to gain women’s right to vote. This influenced the minds of some to allow women’s suffrage, but unfortunately not enough. During World War 1, in the absence of men women were left to support the nation; The NAWSA saw this as their chance to prove that women deserved the ability to vote. They seized this opportunity to persuade President Woodrow Wilson to ratify the 19th Amendment in 1920 after decades of fighting for their rights to vote.…

    • 626 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Also, men were the common denominator in keeping them from making a political difference. Women were still feeling a great deal of injustices on a daily bases and saw voting rights as the first step in gaining complete equality. Suffragist believed women’s emancipation could be the only way to secure social advantages in society. During the later stages of Industrial Revolution, women were entering the workforce in larger numbers then ever before in history and becoming more finically independent. In Sandra Holton’s Feminism And Democracy: Women 's Suffrage and Reform Politics in Britain, 1900-1918 she argues that women’s political liberation was building upon it successful alliances between the suffrage movement and political unions.…

    • 723 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Her biggest reasons for wanting a women president is because there is not enough women within America’s government history. She feels that young girls will see this trend of men in government and become discouraged in striving for a position in government. She also notes all of the other countries that have welcomed women as a part of their government and she thinks that America should follow suit. It is for these reasons that people see Clinton’s gender as an opportunity for a better country rather than Clinton’s stand on public and political issues. However, America seems closely split down the middle between people who want change and people who do not.…

    • 1146 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    After the Civil War, women wanted to vote, especially after the 15th amendment passed. This amendment to the Constitution was that black men now had the right to vote. Many women thought that would be their “prize” for keeping everything running while men were away. The Republican Party, who passed the amendment let the woman down. It made women feel worse too, because it was the first time the Constitution put in the word “men” instead of “citizens.” Women over the years kept fighting and protesting for the right to vote, and eventually the right came, but over fifty years from when the suffrage movement started.…

    • 1162 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women’s rights have been a major problem in America for years, with the start of the Women’s Rights Movement and the signing of the Declaration of Sentiments in 1848. In 1919, the women’s suffrage amendment was added to the Constitution, giving women the right to vote for the first time. Despite all of this, nearly a century later, women are fighting for justice through equality in the workplace. Correcting this problem is important because America was founded on the establishment of justice. Much has been done to correct certain aspects of gender inequality in the workplace, but nothing so far has put an end to it.…

    • 1078 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Later, she met with President Theodore Roosevelt in 1905 to give women the right to vote (Bio.com). Susan then died a year later, but in the 1920’s the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution gave all women the right to vote (Bio.com). Susan B. Anthony spent most of her life fighting for women's rights. Although she was never able to see it possible. She spent about sixty years trying to allow women vote and have equal rights to men, but unfortunately passed away before.…

    • 539 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Elizabeth Cady Stanton was one of those few people that did. She took the advice and kept going until she could not go anymore. Ms. Stanton had left her impact on the view of women’s rights, and it was a positive one. Her time as president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association gave her time to voice her opinions to allow every person to vote, man or woman, black or white. Even though she was a woman, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and others said, “They thought blacks must be given the right to vote first” (Shea 17).…

    • 1064 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This was the commencement of a time period called the “Reconstructive Era.” This is also where Stanton met her life-long suffragist partner, Susan B. Anthony(LaMance 1). Anthony was inspired to become a suffragist due to the fact that she was denied to speak at a temperance convention simply because she was a woman.She did everything she could to ensure that women would receive their suffrage. One of the acts she is most commonly known for is voting illegally in the election of 1872. This inspired many women to join the womens suffrage act. Susan B. Anthony went on to be one of the most influential women(Susan 1).After Seneca Falls, Stanton and Anthony traveled all across the United States.…

    • 1133 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    She begins her speech giving a brief history to support the facts in her argument: “First, the history of our country”(1). “Second, the suffrage for women already established in the United States makes women suffrage for the nation inevitable” (2). ”Third, the leadership of the United States in world democracy compels the enfranchisement of its own women” (2). By opening her speech with hard facts, she sets the foundation for her reasoning. Men especially are drawn to listen because rarely do women at this time attempt to take a stand for something so prominent.…

    • 1130 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays