Anna Shaw's Speech

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Rhetorical Analysis of “The Fundamental Principle of a Republic”
The women’s suffrage movement was one of the most well-established movements recorded in U.S. History. Many women were institutionalized because they wanted a right every American citizen should be able to acquire. On June 15, 1915, American citizen Anna Shaw delivered a speech to challenge the political platform of injustice. Shaw indicates in this speech that women could do much more than cook, clean, and bear children. In “The Fundamental Principle of a Republic,” Shaw effectively incorporates the rhetorical principles of logos, anecdote, and procatalepsis to indomitably persuade her audience to support the women’s suffrage movement.
Shaw employs logos to provide justification for her belief that women should have the right to vote. Shaw effectively voices that “men wrote such documents as were went from the Massachusetts legislature, from the New York legislature … which rang with the profoundest measures of freedom and justice” (2). Shaw is stating that men have it documented on paper that men have the right to freedom and justice creating the inequality of sexes. Men were thought to be superior to women because women were justified as “weak,” therefore creating a government
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When the movement is a case to help gain the rights of women, the process creates conflict. After the women’s suffrage movement, the U.S government concealed legal evidence that in fact all citizens that have stayed within the nation for a period of time can vote, it caused havoc amongst genders in the country. By subtly incorporating the rhetorical principles logos, anecdote, and procatalepsis in her speech, Shaw inquires support from the audience to demand the rights of women and perform their duty as an American citizen so that they can certify a more promising future for the

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