What Is The Cause Of Women's Suffrage?

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It was back in 1848, women like Elizabeth Stanton were pleading for their right to vote. Stanton was a demagogue for the rights of women. All women, at the time, were all denied the essential right to be a part of the bigger picture and to be equal. Woman suffrage was the single largest enfranchisement and extension of democratic rights in our nation’s history. Women’s Suffrage is one of the most important American Political movements. It was the nineteenth-century women’s rights movement. Women were to only be devoted to home life and raising children, if they had any. Elizabeth Stanton married Henry Stanton, who was an officer in the New York State Anti-Slavery Society back in 1840. They actually sped up their marriage so they could travel …show more content…
Elizabeth was the daughter of a lawyer, who was given the best education available to women during the time while attending Emma Willard’s Troy Seminary. Stanton studied law in her father’s office and became a student of legal and constitutional history. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was a Quaker and “Quaker woman’s rights advocates were linked not by wealth but by a shared awareness of “that God was in every person.” “Quakers usually committed themselves to reform movements in the larger world, especially support for Native Americans, African Americans, and women.” The Seneca Falls Convention would have probably never happened if it wasn’t for Lucretia Mott, Martha Wright, Mary McClintock, and Jane Hunt coming into Stanton’s life and supporting her as a leader. Lucretia Mott was one of the main supporters behind Stanton in a convention. It all started when all women were denied a seat at the international London convention due to our gender. That is where Stanton and Mott met. Mott was 47 and Stanton …show more content…
She had gone to every lecture, church, theatre, concert, and temperance, peace, and prison-reform conventions within her reach. Waterloo, Lucretia, Mary, Martha, Jane, and Elizabeth all drew up a call for a “Women’s Rights Convention,” to meet the following week in the Wesley Chapel of Seneca Falls. Once July 19th, 1848 came around the convention was finally held. It was referred to as the Seneca Falls Convention. 300 people came to support, about 40 of those who attended were men; a lot the attendees were Quaker. It only lasted two days. The first day was for women only and the second day for the general public. But many men attended the first day alone. They were admitted due to their interest. Mary McClintock’s husband was the only participating husband besides Lucretia’s. The girls had even convinced Lucretia’s husband, James Mott, to chair the meeting. “The ninth resolution, which argued for “elective franchise,” proved to be the most radical, even to Mott.” But Fredrick Douglas, a freed slave and newspaper editor, argued for its approval and spotlighted its necessities. By the end of the conversation one hundred men and women had signed the Declarations of Sentiments and Resolutions. There was so much to talk about how two days weren’t nearly enough; the women decided to continue the sessions two weeks later in Rochester, New York. Despite all the negative feedback coming from the press and soon after the public,

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