The Influence Of Julius Caesar

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Julius Caesar is upheld as one of the most influential politicians of European history. Caesar was truly influential for every man and women of Rome. Caesar was successful in the battle field and had a large group of dedicated followers, but more importantly Caesar caused some anger and some extreme hatred towards himself. Julius Caesar was assassinated because the people of Rome stood firmly against a tyrant, rumors regarding Julius Caesar caused fear and uncertainty of Rome’s future, and people had personal vindications against Caesar himself. Romans prided themselves on their involvement in their government with their right to vote. Many men across Italy fought for the right to vote in Roman elections. Keeping the Roman government free of …show more content…
19. 58). Caesar also took charge of state funds, taking away this right from the senate (Taylor, 172). In addition, Caesar took away the tribunes power of proposing laws; the only way it was possible to present a law in an assembly was if the law had been constructed within Caesar’s office (Taylor, 173). Caesar gave for giving himself tribunal rights because he preferred to to cut out “middle-men” (Yavetz, 194). Caesar wanted to be the only man to deal with certain matters – which is against Rome’s typical government. Apart from the removal of power and authority amongst the government, Caesar was given too many honours which angered many Romans. These Romans thought these awards were too extreme and worried about state of their government. Caesar was given the epithet “Father of His Country”, which alluded to absolute power and control (Suet. Div. Jul. 43). Absolute power is something that had previously been kept out of office, due to the want of citizens wanting to be involved in …show more content…
Many people thought that his statue was a symbol for the celebration of slavery. There was a diadem on the head of Caesar’s statue, which was worn by monarch to celebrate their sovereignty (Nicolaus Dam. 19. 58). Caesar also refused any knowledge of the diadem being placed on his statue and accused the tribunes of putting there only to ridicule him later.
Besides the rumors that were spread by the people of Rome, one of Caesar’s flaws was that he did not pay attention to these rumors. His absence in confronting these rumours only damaged his image more. He would not deny any rumors which escalated the rumors and prompted people to add to them (Yavetz, 204).
The vicious rumors did nothing but add to the fear and hatred of Caesar for the conspirators. The rumor that Caesar was in fact trying to become a king in order to take over Parthia was a big contributing factor for the men to assassinate the dictator (Suet. Div. Jul. 43). This only increased the fear that Caesar was going to tarnish the reputation of their government. These men also feared that Caesar would move the capital closer to his mistress, again damaging Italy as a whole. As well as the proposed celebration of slavery lead to the conspiracy of his murder. Equally as important, Caesar’s failure to expose these rumors, and deny the accusations of ruining Rome ultimately led to his own

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