War Against Mexico Summary

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Chapter seven of the reading this week was about the war against Mexico. The title of the chapter was a very fitting title, because the Americans saw the Mexicans as foreigners in their own land. The Americans wanted to claim the Mexican land as their own, and pushed the native people out of their homes. One thing extremely interesting about the reading was the fact that the Irish people were fighting against the Mexicans, when the Irish were just in the same position as the Mexicans; only the Irish were facing the British. In 1830, the government in Mexico prohibited American immigration into Texas, as well as banned slavery in Mexico. Mexico during this time was in a very different place than America. They seemed to have a different focus …show more content…
Mexico actually prohibited slave owners from setting up farms and plantations. Americans continuously broke laws, and justified these actions in many ways. The American people had to always be the conqueror; they could not bow down to other races, and claimed the Mexican people did not utilize their land. They felt they were justified in their actions, and that ultimately caused the Mexican-American war over Texas. The Mexican-American War of 1836, because 20,000 Americans were living in Texas compared to the 4,000 living in Texas. Ultimately the American invaders won the Battle over San Antonio, ending the war. All of this information is important for Americans to understand how we became the United States of America we are today. The Hidalgo Treaty allowed the United States to but Texas, California, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Colorado, and Utah in 1848. The treaty ultimately led to the Gold Rush in California. Similar to the Chinese, the Mexicans faced the Mexican Miner’s Tax that taxed the Mexican people that mined for gold. Even if the land was there home originally the Mexican people were now seen as immigrants. One of the strangest things to me to read this week was the Anti-Vagrancy …show more content…
The guest lecture material covered this topic thoroughly, and was titled “Native Americans from Removal to Reservation.” This is the life of the Native American people after the formation of America. We first looked at when people arrived in America, and how the Native Americans were pushed out of their lands, because the Americans wanted the land for themselves. This lecture brings up what was looked at as the “Indian Problem.” Possible solutions to the “problem” include: assimilation of Indians into American society, protect Indians on their ancestral lands, remove them to more distant lands, and finally destroy them. The lecture also discusses the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, which led to the Lewis and Clark expedition, as well as further expansion in the West. All of this is important information, because we have heard about these events in school, but this information helps us better understand the expansion of America. Americans came to the U.S. and settled in the East, and eventually they wanted more land gradually leading them to expand to the West. The Louisiana Purchase was the first step, and the next would be the Mexican-American War, followed by the Hidalgo treaty. Some of the policies put in place included: the War Department, Bureau of Indian Affairs 1824, Department of Interior 1849, Indian Trade and Intercourse Act 1790-1802, and Worcester v. Georgia

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