Effects Of The Civil Rights Movement

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The transition from liberal to conservative ideas was caused by the Civil Rights Movement, American involvement in Vietnam, and the mistrust of the government. The general population was ready to move past the civil rights movement in which the democrats in office were so invested. The Vietnam War was deepened solely by democratic presidents. The corruption within the Democratic Party pushed them out of office. Though each factor allowed for the transition, the end of the democratic rule started with the Civil Rights Movement.
The Civil Rights Movement began with the most important court decision of the 20th century. Brown vs. The Topeka Board of Education stated that all public schools had to integrate. Following this decision, African-Americans began protesting how they were treated within the United States. Nonviolent protests orchestrated by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. were the core of the Civil Rights Movement. President John F. Kennedy, the president at the time, came to publically support
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The majority of the population agreed that getting involved with Vietnam was a mistake. Many believed that the war in Vietnam was not America’s battle to fight. This general disagreement caused groups like Students for a Democratic Society to be created, and lead to multiple protests throughout the country, and even riots. Similar to the civil rights movement, peaceful protests would turn violent not because of the protesters, but because of the police. At Kent State University, a few innocent bystanders were shot and killed, all because of a simple protest over the Vietnam War (“Vietnam War Protests”). People were no longer happy with the Democrats that led them into a costly, unnecessary war, and this ultimately pushed them out of office. These violent protests and the Vietnam War in general provided for a large mistrust in the

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