The Importance Of The Civil Rights Movement

Better Essays
How important was the Double V Campaign and WW2 in the growing demand for Civil Rights between 1945 and 1968?

Before WW2 not much had changed in the Civil Rights Campaign: People still had the view of ‘separate but equal’ and the Jim Crow laws were still in place. However in the mid 60’s the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Acts made significant changes towards Civil Rights. The Double V Campaign and WW2 were important in the growing demand for Civil Rights between 1945 and 1968 to a certain extent. However Prejudice and Discrimination, Effective Black Organisations and Effective Black Leaders were all important factors too.

During WW2, over 1 million black men served in the armed forces, however everything was operated in
…show more content…
He was the head of the Southern Christian leadership Conference and brought other churchmen together to protest peacefully and non-violent. King lead a march in Birmingham, Alabama. He brought young children into the march and the government used tear gas and fire hoses on them. This violence made the white people look terrible but made blacks look innocent and responsible. This shows that Martin Luther King lead black people well to give them a positive image in the media, showing blacks behaving nobly and rationally in the face of racism and brutality that would encourage the government to give them more civil rights. King also organised a march to Washington in 1964 and preformed his “I have a dream speech” in front of 250000 white and black people, where he declared he wanted de-segregation. This shows that he was telling his ideas to both white and black people to bring them together to give black people more rights. Effective black leaders were important in the growing demand for Civil rights between 1945 and 1968. This was a less important factor than the Double V Campaign and WW2 as there was actually no laws changed, however WW2 brought about the executive order 8802 to stop

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    The CRA was significant to African Americans because on paper it ended segregation in public places and in the employment process. The CRA impacted the African American community greatly by increasing minority protections and considerably influenced the ratification of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the Fair Housing Act of 1968. The CRA influenced the presidential election of 1964, and the momentum of the African American civil rights group through bringing light to African American Civil Rights Activists and what they represented. The consequences that surfaced from the Civil Rights Act of 1964, was the uproar of upset minorities because the act did not include poll tax to be banned, and increased countless riots of the tired and upset African Americans due to the unacceptable living conditions and/or fees and the access of jobs and homes. The current status of the African American group is that they remain fighting for their…

    • 1456 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Dark to Light “Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”Martin Luther King jr. is a black American who essentially led the civil rights movement. King is a southern african American activist who took on leadership roles and created a movement, that marched into history. Martin Luther king jr. changed history by standing as a leading figure in the civil rights movement. King embraced the idea of peaceful protest through “civil disobedience”,leading more men, women, and children in marches than most others before him and lastly became a hero that blazed a way for racial equality even today.…

    • 781 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The statement that “the Civil Rights Movement [CRM]…owed absolutely to African Americans’ experience in World War [2]” is not at all true. World War 2 may have accelerated the growth of the movement, but it was not the only factor that caused Blacks in the US to begin to demand for civil rights. The Great Depression and First Great Migration allowed for World War 2 to be very significant in the lives of Black people. The war helped foster the Movement because its end allowed for a Black middle class to emerge and Black war veterans were more determined than ever to fight for equality. While all of these things are true, it is also true that many Blacks had been fighting for civil rights for decades, such as those with the NAACP, and younger…

    • 1589 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    E. B. Du Bois, the editor of its monthly journal, who used it to publicize the plights of black people and organization efforts, spearheaded the NAACP. The NAACP preached racial unity and sought complete integration in American society. In a moment of civil disobedience, Rosa Parks, a black woman, refused to give up her seat on the bus to a standing white man. Parks was eventually arrested and ejected from the bus but also, unknowingly set forth waves in Montgomery, Alabama 's black community.…

    • 1512 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    One thing that the party was known for was creating the “Ten-Point Program” which encompassed the organizations goals. These goals consisted of wanting freedom, full employment, decent housing, elimination of police brutality, Black men to be exempt from military service, and etc. After the “Ten-Point Program”, Newton became concerned with the police brutality that was happening, and organized armed patrols within the Black Panther Party to follow police officers and monitor their activity. Furthermore, Newton encouraged the notion that the organization should also lead black communities by example by participating in outreach programs such as free breakfast for Black children and offered free healthcare to the residents of the Black ghetto. Similar to Bob Moses and the Freedom Summer volunteers, the Black Panthers wanted to provide hope and courage to the Blacks that were still living in poverty and to motivate them to pursue equality.…

    • 2280 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Color Of Love Research Paper

    • 2312 Words
    • 10 Pages

    Dr. King led the March on Washington, followed by mainly many African-Americans; to have a voice about racial discrimination and put it end to it all. His famous “I Have a Dream” speech was being heard all around the world and pushed forward with the already movement of Civil Rights. In brief, he described his aspirations for society in accepting, not only his vision, but also the vision of his people, in the same realm as Whites. To compare, Mildred Loving was involved in this spectrum of discrimination for her skin color. Another hardship was facing her way, marrying a White…

    • 2312 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The children decide to stand up join hands across the nation, taking a step forward- “a step that rocked the richest, most powerful nation to its foundations.” The children simply cannot accept the injustice anymore, so they decided to act. In these actions, King implies his call to all Americans to join the fight for equality. Choosing children for his narrative helps King to connect with his audience, as their innocent nature highlights his point about undeserved injustice and allows them to sympathize with the African Americans that the children represent. Their home cities stretching across the nation allow King to emphasize the span of the movement for civil rights- it is a nationwide movement, not simply a regional issue. He indirectly describes the urgent nature of the fight for equality here.…

    • 821 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Civil Rights Movement was a movement that helped give African Americans equal rights such as voting, integration, and equal opportunity in jobs. It lasted for a century, but it peaked in the 1950’s and 60’s with events such as Plessy v. Ferguson, integration of Central High School, “I Have a Dream” speech, etc. The most significant events in moving civil rights forward for African Americans was Montgomery Bus Boycott, bombing of Birmingham Church, and Selma marches. Although these events helped move civil rights forward, the negative attitude towards African Americans in the Deep South made it harder and longer to fight for equality. The attitudes towards African Americans were often discriminatory and oppressive.…

    • 767 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    When the Civil Rights Movement began in the 1950s it was the beginning of a new future for African Americans. The Civil Rights Movement was a movement to gain basic rights for African Americans (Davis, 2014). It created the rights that said the difference of skin color between black and white people made no difference, both races deserved the same treatment. Since the Civil Rights Movement racial equality has improved through things such as African American’s government roles, and their rights in everyday life. But even today, where skin color should make no difference, black people still experience segregation.…

    • 1250 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Anne was also actively working with the local NAACP, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and the Congress of Racial Equality (Core) chapters to press the importance of black voting rights. As the number of black voters increased, the more political power they would have. President Kennedy being elected was a result of that. He gained African Americans trust by actively being involved in creating equal opportunities for all (Hine, 587). As the violence increased out of anger, 250,000 citizens marched to Washington D.C. in support of Kennedy trying to pass a new Civil Rights bill (Hine, 591).…

    • 911 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays