Vietnam War Dbq Analysis

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Overall, the Vietnam war was a popular conflict that failed in terms of the defense of S, Vietnam against the communist N. Vietnam, and changed many American’s opinions about the nation’s role in the world and on their lives. The Vietnam War was yet another example of the escalation of the cold war, but his time, American intentions were completely misguided, and the damage done to society was huge. American involvement in Vietnam increased conflict and tension in the U.S. because of the overwhelming unpopularity of the government decisions causing great social unrest and unhappiness especially young people, political corruption in the Johnson and Nixon administrations, and economic mismanagement of the war effort vs. domestic programs. As …show more content…
LBJ’s continuation of the New Frontier, one of the society programs needed sufficient funds to function properly. Doc. D illustrated how the war spending, especially during LBJ’s presidency dragged down these programs. By 1965 over 500,00 troops were sent to Vietnam, and a huge amount of military spending was taking up much of the federal budget. Former president Eisenhower warned in his farewell speech in 1960 that excessive military spending would only increase the power of arms manufacturers, and Senator George McGovern echoes this in Doc. H. The only effective economic management of the Vietnam war was under Nixon with Vietnamization, the gradual decrease in military involvement in Vietnam. However, Nixon still didn’t increase much-needed health programs especially for veterans, further mismanaging the economy. The Vietnam unpopularity, corruption, and mismanagement of the Vietnam war greatly contributed to the turbulent periods of the 1960s and 70s. Even today, our faith in politics and foreign affairs has greatly diminished, leaving behind a bad memory of tensions in the U.S during the Vietnam war and the scars it left on American

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