Transcendentalism In Song Of Myself And A Noiseless Patient Spider

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In the modern literary movement, authors practice certain philosophies that can affect their styles, thoughts, and beliefs. A few examples are Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Walt Whitman. All three authors share one common idea: transcendentalism. In the nineteenth century, transcendentalism is a popular type of philosophical campaign that emphasizes the dignity of an individual and advocates a simple, mindful life. Transcendentalism contains several key ideas, which state that every individual is capable of discovering the truth by themselves through intuition, and humankind, nature, and God are all interconnected. Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman use nature as an example for people to learn how to improve their lives by living …show more content…
Whitman is famous for his enjoyment of American life, which radiates “the idea of the unique and the commonplace as well as the beautiful and the ugly.” (530) Whitman is also well known for his ability to capture the optimism and voice of nature. In fact, he is the writer of a 400 poem book called Leaves of Grass, which captures all aspects of nature and humanity through the use of spiritual language. Two examples of the published poems are Song of Myself and A Noiseless Patient Spider. Both poems promote the idea of enjoying what life has to offer. In Song of Myself, he mentions that he and the universe are the same and will celebrate himself and others. He sees the unity in people “born here of parents born here from parents the same, and their parents the same." (534) Whitman explains that he embraces the good and bad connections between himself and every other thing in the world since like nature, it is unpredictable, yet powerful. Afterwards, he finds a child that asks him “What is the grass?” (534) and Whitman finds multiple answers to the question. Whitman believes that the grass could be a produced babe of the vegetation, the flag of his disposition, the handkerchief of the Lord, or a uniform hieroglyphic, but comes to the conclusion that the grass is the beautiful uncut hair of graves. He states that he will eventually be a part of nature, such as the grass, once he dies. He writes that “... if you want me again, look for me under your boot-soles. You will hardly know who I am or what I mean, but I shall be good health to you nevertheless, and filter and fibre your blood. Failing to fetch me at first keep encouraged, missing me one place search another, I stop somewhere waiting for you.” (537) In simpler terms, Whitman means that he will wait for the reader and be good to them, even if the reader does not recognize it. Whitman understands that a moment will come

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