Romanticism In Walt Whitman

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If there is something Walt Whitman has taught us is how amazing it can be for a single person or group to have experienced the beautiful and romantic power of life. We all have experienced this beauty at least once in our lives. Even those who believe nothing good find themselves loving nature at a certain time. Romanticism is a literary, artistic, and philosophical movement in America from 1820 - 1860 which has three major key which is Intuition, Individualism, and Imagination.It was used the most during the age of Reason and the reason to that is because America was Anxious on creating their own identities and separating themselves from Europe and become intellectually independent. During this time there was a massive rise of great poets …show more content…
We see this not only from the perspective of Spirituality but also from the perspective of Visions of America.One of the first themes that are in common with all of Whitman's 3 poems is Spirituality.The first poem that shows us Spirituality is "Song of Myself," it shows us Whitman's ambivalence about religion and he thinks that society has surpassed organized religion with its hierarchies and rules, but his language is full of Biblical references and talk of the soul and the spirit. That the body and the soul are two sides of the same coin. The second poem is "When I heard the Learn'd Astronomer" whereas the astronomer might argue that his abstract knowledge amounts to the contemplation of divine and eternal things, Whitman affirms the body and the senses over the mind. The Third poem is "I hear America Singing" you get a sense of spirituality from feeling the strong spirits of the working Americans. "spirituality" was just one of the common themes but now we are gonna start with visions of America. In Walt Whitman poems there is a similarity in the common theme about visions of America. For "Song of Myself" America is not a place to Whitman, it was also an idea and a goal to shoot for. His America is a place where all people are equal; all jobs are equally important, and people feel for one another with a passionate, neighborly love. He views his identity as being so wrapped up in this American idea that the poem's title could easily have been "Song of America" instead of "Song of Myself." In "I Hear America Singing," Whitman's vision of America involves workers likes mechanics, carpenters, washerwomen, and ploughboys as all who work to make this nation great. In "When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer" he speaks in the vision of Americans who wants to get out and enjoy their jobs instead of being in a class all bored. This for most is the best theme out of the other themes. Romanticism is a

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