Thomas Paine And The American Revolution

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Thomas Paine was a renowned pro-American writer and author of some of the most persuasive texts of the American Revolution. Paine wrote in a manner that appealed to the masses, not just American elites. He often quoted the Bible in his arguments in an attempt to engage people of all classes in the struggle for American independence and for a rejection of government based on hereditary monarchy. In Paine’s pamphlet Common Sense, it said the Colonists should aim for complete independence from Britain. He argued that Britain governed the Americans for its own benefit, not theirs, and that the distance between the two nations made governing from England very inefficient. The pamphlet sold in its thousands and became very influential. It helped …show more content…
Paine had been Washington 's most out- spoken supporter during the American Revolution. Many blamed Washington when defeat looked promising in the early stages of the war, Paine praised the general in The American Crisis. George Washington ordered officers to read Paine 's The American Crisis to the Continental Army. Contained in that pamphlet were Paine 's famous words, "These are the times that try mens souls" (Paine). William Hogeland’s article Thomas Paine’s Revolutionary Reckoning says “While others groused that Paine mistakenly believed Washington shared his vision of the American Revolution as the first step in a global movement for equality, Washington was inexperienced and indecisive. Paine conjured a romantic image of a wise and heroic leader that, as the war progressed, proved to be a self-fulfilling prophecy” (Hogeland). Washington and Paine were unlikely comrades from the beginning. However, Paine and Washington were two completely different people says …show more content…
Rights of Man argued against Edwards Burkes Reflections on the Revolution in France. Burkes generally supported the colonists in the American Revolution, and he also felt that Britain should be more pragmatic about the American colonist 's rights and complaints. Even though Burke supported the American Revolution, he opposed the French Revolution. There is a controversial debate about Thomas Paine and Edward Burkes through their own literature. In the article, The Great Debate: Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine and the Birth of Right and Left by Alan Ryan says: [Thomas Paine’s Rights of Man] was defending [against Burkes] about a doctrine of natural rights of the kind that the American revolutionaries of 1776 had used to justify their rebellion. He seems to have been genuinely surprised that Burke, who had been supportive of the American colonists, was not equally supportive of the French revolutionaries

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