Theme Of Thieves Road The Black Hills Betrayal And Custer's Path To Little Bighorn

Superior Essays
Terry Mort, the author of Thieves’ Road: The Black Hills Betrayal And Custer’s Path To Little Bighorn, was born in Poland, Ohio, where he then shortly moved to Morristown, New Jersey. It was in this town that his fascination of United States history began; stemming from the close proximity of the Jacob Ford Mansion, as well as the abundance of Civil War monuments littering the town. Throughout his primary schooling, Mort credited many books given to him during this time as inspiration for his motivation to pursue writing as his career- most notably, Robert McCloskey’s Homer Price, and Palmer Cox’s Brownie Book. After high school, Mort went on to earn his Master’s degree in literature from both Princeton University and the University of Michigan. …show more content…
To give the reader background knowledge, Mort discussed the severity of the debts caused by the Civil War, as well as the United States government’s response, and the reasoning behind the lust for gold in the West. Mort then delved into the ethnocentrism of both Sioux culture and American culture, and the effects of the Fetterman battle. Mort then described the Seventh Cavalry, the Yellowstone expedition and following battles, and the economic crash of 1873. Custer’s preparation for the Black Hills expedition was then examined, as well as the expedition itself. Finally, Mort discussed the discovery of gold in the Black Hills, the Battle of Little Bighorn itself, and the aftermath of the …show more content…
I agree with Mort’s findings in that I believe the Battle of Little Bighorn was caused by a multitude of conflicts of many different reasons. I especially enjoyed his attention to the cultural differences that arose throughout the timeline instead of just focusing on the physical confrontations that occurred. The content discussed expanded and supported my knowledge on the subject by providing the same details I was given in the lectures and textbook, but delving into even more specifics. I do believe this book could have been improved by creating more of a focus on the content being discussed. At times it felt as though too much information was being relayed all at once. I did enjoy this book for the most part. At times, Mort’s writing read like a textbook with little style or variation in tone. What stood out to me the most was his description of Custer. Mort’s portrayal of his character and personality made it seem more like a historical fiction novel than a nonfiction book, which made it much easier to read as well as more enjoyable. I would recommend this book to others only if they showed interest in the content being discussed. It was difficult at times to get connected and interested with the book in areas where what seemed like a minute part of the book was stretched into such great detail, and made the book less enjoyable overall. I feel as though the intended audience for this novel is directed towards those with

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    This reason is why the book does a better job of telling the story, it is much more detailed and includes elements of the story which the movie fails to do. For example the book does a better job of including Ender's internal monologue. This is so important because it helps readers actually understand what Ender's thinking and it allows them to empathize with him because of everything he's going through. The book also includes what happens to Ender after he defeats the buggers. It goes into more detail telling the reader where Ender ends up and what he does with Valentine after the buggers are gone.…

    • 977 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    William Faulkner’s As I lay dying is an extremely thought provoking novel. Faulkner’s diction and writing style is much more complex than both contemporary novels and novels from his era. Therefore topics of discussion are generally more philosophical and thoughtful. This book should be taught in classes because it provokes the reader’s thoughts, helps the reader develop a broader thought process and generates a more difficult yet more sophisticated topic of discussion. Since modern day novels are written in our vernacular it’s much easier to interpret or analyze the plots, details, and characters.…

    • 249 Words
    • 1 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    There are books for non-fictional information as well as fictional ‘pleasure reads’, you learn from both but in different ways. Someone will normally pick up a book once they have a vague understanding of a subject or use it to learn. The language is less complex than a scholarly journal but much more advanced than a magazine. A short passage in a book on antisocial personality disorder says that a sufferer may show no concern in their behavior or see any reason for change even after being shown the possible ramifications of such behavior. This is due to the lack of guilt and remorse the sufferers feel (Kernberg 53).…

    • 1328 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    I 'm sure it was to emphasize the point Blackmon was trying to convey, but I feel like it only made the novel harder to digest than it would have been otherwise. I believe that if Blackmon had demonstrated each point once, it would have been a much faster read, and I would have enjoyed the book more. I also would have more time to analyze it, and reflect on what I had learned from it. While this issue is something I feel kept me from reflecting on the book, I thoroughly enjoyed reading it. Each part of the book contributed further to my understanding of the most fundamental parts of American history.…

    • 1109 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Although it cannot single-handedly combat loneliness, books are one way to help some people feel less lonely. For example, when people read good fiction, they feel as if they are immersed into the book because it presents a compelling and enjoyable tale. Readers begin to experience many things with the characters such as the characters’…

    • 1044 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    It is effective in the way that the characters are developed. It is ineffective in the way that the characters are introduced and the way that the frame of the story is being told. This is hard to follow especially if this is the readers first time reading a Guy Vanderhaeghe novel. It is a difficult novel to read if the reader is not a strong reader and overall very dry to read in the beginning but has some strong exciting parts and is a good…

    • 836 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    It’s rather unfortunate really but, the only way the story could progress. Surprisingly, the plot was quick pace and the way the book was laid out felt necessary to give the story mystery and suspense. The layout may sound complex, however, it’s indeed an easy read. My only problem was the existential emotion I got from reading and may has nothing to do with the story and something more personal level. Although I wouldn’t call it a blemish and was probably the author’s intention.…

    • 430 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Clearly his writing style is watered-down, to borrow the colloquialism, for such an audience. Though I would prefer a piece more scholarly in nature, I do believe that Foster did adequately meet his goals in explaining deeper thought processes for a young student audience and I thusly would recommend this book to others my own age. Works Cited Foster, Thomas. How To Read Like A Professor: A Lively and Entertaining Guide to Reading Between the Lines. New York: Harper Collins Publisher Inc.,…

    • 762 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    As stated before, most of the ideas are somewhat simple, yet he will spend paragraphs explaining them. Overall, I enjoyed the book and found it quite insightful. I recommend it to anyone going into sales or…

    • 1201 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Black Hills Gold Rush

    • 2200 Words
    • 9 Pages

    The actions taken to defend their lands were deemed hostile by the U.S. government and the military was called upon to intervene. Ultimately, it was the harsh reservation policies resulting from conflict created by the Black Hills Gold Rush that drove the Sioux nation to resist against the U.S. Army in the Great Sioux War. The answer to this investigation is only reached when one decides how far back to look in history. That is why the answer to the what caused the Great Sioux War can have multiple correct interpretations. The one important thing to know is that the Black Hills Gold Rush of 1874 predates all the other causes and is what directly set in motion the chain of events that culminated in the Great Sioux War of…

    • 2200 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays