Comparing Faulkner's The Sound And The Fury

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These are the very lines from which the title of novel ‘The Sound and The Fury’ has been taken. These lines, from Macbeth of Shakespeare, are very much suitable for the story of Faulkner’s this novel. It has been claimed by many critics that the story reflects multiple aspects of Southern society of America in twentieth century. It puts light on almost all the aspects of a society i.e. religious dogmas, traditional values, cultural disintegration, liberalism and freedom of women in the society, man as a modern but having material approach towards himself and others, parents and their responsibilities, the fall of pre-established concerns and rituals, a new way of understanding and spending the life, the struggle against the gender discrimination …show more content…
The story is all about a family in the Southern region of America by name of Compson family. It was the family of dignified position and honor in the society. It was once said by Mrs. Caroline that her ancestors or forefathers were occupying the dignified and respected positions in army and other noble institutes or departments of the state. Yet the family gradually declines in reputation and respect in the society. In the very beginning, the story reflects the enlightened position of Compson family, however, as story proceeds slowly and gradually (though the events are not arranged in chronological order, yet through critical and deep inter-textual reading one becomes enough able to comprehend it) towards the last section the family faces disgrace, humiliation, degraded status, and destruction or ruination. “It is generally acknowledged that Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury is a tragic tale that recounts the dissolution and final years of a Southern aristocratic family; trapped by suicidal compulsions and by a value system that no longer serves or preserves them, the Compson family is dragged under the wheel of fortune (Medoro: 2000: …show more content…
More importantly all of the characters mentioned or portrayed in the novel have some sort of symbolical significance. Benjy or Benjamin symbolizes many things as being an innate idiot he represents the fall of family, he also represents Jesus Christ, he has faculty to smell the danger or misfortune occurring or happening with other characters in the novel. Quentin symbolizes the impotence and obsession of having desire to commit incest with his sister Caddy. Jason symbolizes the meanness and selfishness of modern men who are more materialistic and hollow men. Caddy symbolizes the voice for liberalism and freedom of an individual woman; she also symbolizes the disintegration and fragmentation of cultural, religious, and social norms and values. Furthermore, Caddy plays the most important role in the novel, though she does not narrate her own monologue, yet she is found in all of the monologues of the novel. From technical point of view, Faulkner has utilized his skills to produce such a marvelous work by using the technique of stream of consciousness in narrating the events and incidents, which is again a sort of big ‘No’ to the traditional and conventional approach of narrating the stories. It is a sort of way of expressing the event coming or hitting the mind of any character or in other words, it is simply the style of writing down the expressions the way

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