Analysis Of Isolation In John Steinbeck's 'Of Mice And Men'

Great Essays
Chapter 3
Cruelty & Isolation
Q: “At last Carlson said, ‘’If you want to, I’ll put the old devil out of his misery right now and get it over with.’…. Candy said, ‘Maybe tomorra. Le’s wait till tomorra.’ …. ‘Let’s get it over with,’ Carlson said. ‘We can’t sleep with him stinkin’ around in here.’” (Steinbeck 44)

C: Carlson wanted to end the life of the one thing which mattered most to Candy which was his dog. Candy had had that dog since he was a pup and he always tells stories of how it was the best sheep dog he had ever seen and how he had made lots of memories with that dog. This shows how cruel the people at the ranch could be because they didn’t care how much Candy loved that dog, and it took Carlson almost no regret of killing him.
…show more content…
‘I know who done it,’ he cried. ‘That big son-of-a-bitch done it. I know he done it. Why---ever’body else was out there playin’ horseshoes.’ He worked himself into a fury. ‘I’m gonna get him. I’m going for my shotgun. I’ll kill the big son-of-a-bitch myself. I’ll shoot ‘m in the guts. Come on, you guys.’ He ran furiously out of the barn. Carlson said, ‘I’ll get my Luger,’ and he ran out too.” (Steinbeck 92)

C: This as an Aha-moment for Curley since he quickly figures out two things. One of them is who killed his wife and the other is that he finally figures out a way to get back at Lennie for breaking his arm. This shows cruelty because of how quickly Carlson and Curley say they will kill Lennie. They don’t consider that it might have been an accident or if Lennie even did it in the first place. It shows that nobody cares for anyone else and that they will kill each other if necessary.

Kindness & the Importance of Friendship
Q: “It seemed to take George some time to free his words. ‘He---would of went south,’ he said. ‘We came from north so he would of went south.’” (Steinbeck
…show more content…
And Carlson, ‘Now what the hell ya suppose is eatin’ them two guys?’” (Steinbeck 103)

C: After George just killed his best friend and Slim is helping him feel better, Carlson and Curley are wondering why they are so bothered. This shows that this would be a normal thing to happen in the 1920s. Killing someone let alone your best friend is something very cruel but Carlson thinks that George should be okay. This shows how isolated everyone is and expected to be.

Kindness & Importance of Friendship
Q: “The hand shook violently, but his face set and his hand steadied. He pulled the trigger. The crash of the shot rolled up the hills and rolled down again. Lennie jarred, and then settled slowly forward to the sand, and he lay without quivering.” (Steinbeck 102)

C: This is a contrast and contradiction as you would expect George to try and help Lennie escape but instead decides to shoot him. I think this is kindness because George shoots Lennie in the back of the head which causes him no pain. The other guys probably would have caused him great pain as Curley said he was going to shoot him in the guts. This was hard for George but it was better for Lennie since he didn’t have to go through the pain and torture given by

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    Yet George does not want his best friend to suffer, he was willing to help his friend died in a less painful way. The way that George shoots Lennie, his best friend will not need to experience the pain. “And George raised the gun and steadied it, and he brought the muzzle of it close to the back of Lennie’s head” (Steinbeck, 106). By shooting Lennie right on the back of his head, he will die quickly and with less pain compare to shooting him in the guts like Curley would. The decision that George did for Lennie was merciful, he was killing Lennie just to save him from the painful death that Curley was planning for him.…

    • 1001 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “I’m gonna get him. I’m going for my shotgun. I’ll kill the big son-of-a-bitch myself. I’ll shoot ‘im in the guts.” (Steinbeck, page 96). Curley wants to shoot Lennie and have him die a painful death.…

    • 723 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In comparison, another reason George should have taken Lennie’s life is that it was an act of ‘mercy’. At the trial of a millionaire who had killed her own son, this was what had been described and said: “The weepy mother confessed to taking her son Jude’s life in February of 2010 at Swank Peninsula Hotel, but insists it was a ‘mercy killing’ to spare him from abuse at the hands of half a dozen people”(Rosenberg). In the book, George decides he should find Lennie and kill him first because he does not want to imagine what would happen to him in the hands of the other guys. Just like in the article of the millionaire, George wants to find a way to give Lennie the most peaceful death possible. He accomplishes this by making Lennie happy just before his time of death.…

    • 1079 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Steinbeck no longer uses cunning ways to hide his indications instead he uses blunt information. Lennie death is related to the death of Candy’s dog from how he is shot to the reason. Candy’s dog is considered no good to Candy as explained by Carlson. Carlson goes on to tell Candy that he’d outta shoot the to end it’s pain stating “...Shoot him right in the back of the dead… He won't even quiver. After the long debate Carlson pulls out his bag from underneath his bunk pulls out his lugger, then takes the gun out then shoot Candy’s dog the way he had explained it before.…

    • 1660 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Curley wants to shoot Lennie in the guts after he finds that Lennie killed his wife in the barn. After he finds out Curley starts chasing after Lennie “I’m goin, he said I'm gonna shoot the guts outta that big bastard myself, even if I only got one hand.I’m gonna get im. (Steinbeck 98). This supports the argument because it shows that if George didn’t kill Lennie then he would have suffered at the hands of Curley. Curley was going to shoot him in the guts and getting shot in the guts is worse than getting shot in the head.…

    • 804 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Jarold Ramsey notes that, “When the murder of Duncan is discovered, Macbeth betters his wife’s instructions … and slays the grooms out right, before they can talk. Even in his state of grief and shock, the humane Macduff is astonished at this new burst of violence” (290). Ramsey reiterates the point that Macduff is surprised to see such erratic behavior from Macbeth, who would have never done anything of the sort. In addition, Ramsey says how Macbeth “betters his wife’s instructions” and kills Duncan’s two guards, even though that was not a part of the original plan. This critic is suggesting the same idea that William Shakespeare is hinting at; after murdering Duncan, Macbeth begins acting irrationally.…

    • 2071 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Candy was left with no other option but to shot his longtime friend. Candy fought against the loneliness by sharing the same dream that George and Lennie had of settling down on their own place, which Candy’s greatest fear was losing the opportunity of joining them on their farm. Candy’s dog was no longer any good, just like Lennie was no longer any good for George. The way that Candy’s dog was killed foreshadowed the way George killed Lennie, “And George raised the gun and steadied it, and he brought the muzzle of it close to the back of Lennie’s head. The hand shook violently, but his face set and his hand steadied.…

    • 816 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Candy clearly is hesitant about the idea until he finally gives in to Carlson who won’t stop pressuring Candy to kill his dog. The second time this occurs is at the very end of the book when George shoots Lennie. It does not directly state that George is doing this in order to end Lennies suffering, however it is implied that George shoots lennie to end his suffering and to make his death painless unlike how it might have…

    • 1065 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Steinbeck writes about the dog being shot to end it’s suffering leading to George’s suffering from all the trouble Lennie caused. “I oughtta of shot that dog myself, George. I shouldn’t oughtta let no stranger shoot my dog.” (61). Candy didn’t shoot his dog and now he regrets his decision. “And George raised the gun and steadied it / close to the back of Lennie’s head / He pulled the trigger.” (106).…

    • 1059 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Although Candy has “‘...been around him so much that [he] never notice[s] how he stinks...’ ”, the other ranch hands,especially Carlson, despise having the dog around (Steinbeck, 44). During one part of the novelCarlson asks, “‘Why’n’t you shoot him, Candy?” (Steinbeck, 44). Even though it would be mer-ciful to the dog Candy argues that he “ ‘...[was the] best damn sheep dog [he] ever seen’ ” andthat he ‘“...had ‘im ever since he was a pup”’ (Steinbeck 24, 44). Candy has “ ‘...had ‘im tolong...’ ” and says “ ‘...[he] couldn’ do that’ ” (Steinbeck, 45). He has a hard time letting go of the dog even though it is probably the most merciful thing to do for it.…

    • 1067 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays