Importance Of Ranch Hands In Of Mice And Men

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Ranch Hands are made to be tough. They don’t need anyone. They’re okay with living their lives traversing throughout the land. Does this mean they aren’t allowed to show emotions? In Of Mice and Men, John Steinbeck allows us to believe that this is what the characters think a working ranch hand should be. Candy, Slim, Crooks, Curley, Lennie and George all attempt to shy away from the topic of loneliness. Many of the characters throughout the book know that when they let others see into their personal lives, loneliness would be a resulting factor. When Crooks, Lennie and Candy allowed their emotions to leak, the other outsiders could see that the isolation was getting to them. Emotions intensify when loneliness eats at the mind. Throughout the …show more content…
Lennie began to become nervous at the thought of living a life where George isn’t present. George talks to Lennie and says, "Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don 't belong no place” (Steinbeck 13). George wants Lennie to know that they are lucky to have each other. He paints a picture into Lennie’s mind that without him, he would suffer loneliness just as the other ranch hands feel. The moment Lennie first noticed that he was being a pest to George he went on and said, "If you don ' want me I can go off in the hills an ' find a cave. I can go away any time" (Steinbeck 12). It begins to register to Lennie that he doesn’t ever want George to abandon him. Lennie offers to run away before he would have to deal with George walking out on him. When Lennie entered Crooks’ room for the first time, he was skeptical of Crooks asking him so many questions about George. Crooks continued to taunt Lennie about how George may not return. “I said s’pose George went into town tonight and you never heard of him no more” (Steinbeck 71). Lennie cringed at the thought, “He won’t do it. George wouldn’t do nothing nothing like that” (Steinbeck 71). Crooks stops at the realization of how angry Lennie becomes at the fear of having no one to turn to. Although you can refer to a lot of the characters in Of Mice and Men as outcasts; Lennie is a different kind of …show more content…
When Candy sits in his bunk and hears the gunshot, he knows that he is an outsider. As Candy expresses his sorrow to George, he defeatedly says, “You seen what they done to my dog tonight? They says he wasn 't no good to himself nor nobody else” (Steinbeck 60). Candy feels very alone after they shot his dog. Candy’s dog to him was like a pacifier to a baby. Once they shot his dog due to old age, he questions his skill compared to the other ranch hands. Candy comes to the realization that he has a disability and is not “fresh off the block” anymore. Candy expresses his feelings to George, "When they can me here I wisht somebody 'd shoot me” (Steinbeck 60). Candy doesn’t want to live a life searching for a place to go all alone. George expresses his and Lennie’s dream of getting a small farm together; Candy immediately says he will join in and give more than half of the money needed to seal the deal. “An’ they give me two hundred an’ fifty dollars ‘cause I los’ my hand. An’ I got fifty more saved up right in the bank, right now" (Steinbeck 59). He is willing to give every penny that he is worth just to join in on their dream and break his solid feeling of loneliness. All this time Candy used his dog as some kind of “shield” to hide his loneliness. Candy started to get worried at the issue of being a weight to the ranch hands instead of help; as well as letting the other guys see into his lonely

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