Stonewall Riots In 1969: The Start Of The Gay Revolution

Good Essays
What begins as the Stonewall Riots in 1969 was the beginning of the Gay Revolution. In New York, you can hear miles away people chanting (LGBT) repeatedly to the point their voices were heard across the world. We created the Declaration of Independence that said, “That all men are created equal,” instead American society made homosexuality unacceptable for effeminate of young men and women. Most men and women that were gay had to hide their sexuality, and live the “normal” life that society made up. However, for those who spoke out against discrimination and inequality was subjection of verbal abuse and hate crimes. Some homosexual’s would tried to convince themselves that being gay was a mental illness, because living a “normal” life consists of a man marrying a woman, and not man and man, nor woman and woman. Following the Stonewall Riots in 1969, Brenda Howard helped organize the 1970 Christopher Street Gay Liberation Day Parade. She made an organization easier for African Americans, Hispanics, White, and Transgender patrons to stand up for equality. I followed Ms. Howard through all success and failure and I reported history in the making. I am Ashley Rivera a reporter who saw the …show more content…
Their actions made countless improvements on the gay rights movement resulting in cultural, legal, and social evolutions, including decriminalization of homosexuality across the nation. This movement started off in New York at the Stonewall Inn, were police officers raid the Inn to arrest gay men. However, instead the police officers following the law that cops could no longer legally entrap gay men, nor gay bars just because of their sexual preference. Which lead to Christopher Street, where Brenda Howard formed a Gay Liberation eventually earning her the title “Mother of

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Essay On Stonewall Riots

    • 458 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Before the 1974 heterosexual people classify homosexual as a mental disorder; that all changed after the American Psychiatric Association conduct a resource in 1974, the research prove that homosexual is not a mental disorder. Till to this day the LGBT community still fighting hard to gain their equal right as other people in the community. Now gay and lesbian can get marry in some states. The stonewall riots was the turning point for the LGBT to get their…

    • 458 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Before Stonewall Analysis

    • 845 Words
    • 4 Pages

    While the riots at the Stonewall Inn were instrumental in launching the modern gay rights movement, LGBTQ individuals have existed in all spaces across the decades of American history, as pictured in the documentary Before Stonewall. Each decade of the twentieth century brought different movements, leaders, and progresses with it that set the stage for the customers of a gay bar in Greenwich Village to say “enough is enough” in the face of abuse and marginalization by the police force. In the early part of the century, traditional views on marriage were so widely held that denial of same sex attraction was the only choice for those experiencing it. People who deviated from the norm were forced by overwhelming societal pressure to either conform…

    • 845 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    By the 1960’s the modern gay rights movement was gaining momentum and power, modeled of the African American civil rights movement. Both gays and blacks became more militant in their approaches- one lionized gay militant organization born was Queer Nation. The LGBTQ+ community began shattering the silence around homosexuality through the media, and by fighting off the stigma of being mentally ill. The LGBTQ+ community coupled its sense of oppression with a new sense of power, underscoring their movement and creating momentum for action, and this action was channeled into the Stonewall Rebellion. The Stonewall Riot was in no means the first or only way the modern gay rights movement fought for their rights and against heteronormativity.…

    • 930 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Stonewall Riots

    • 1495 Words
    • 6 Pages

    In 1973, the APA removed homosexuality from the Diagnostic and Statistical manual through a unanimous vote. The Stonewall riots inadvertently created an international community that forced to acknowledge the existence of the gay community. While there was clear tension between gay rights groups and other activist groups, as well as tension within the gay rights groups, gay rights became a forefront issue. There was no longer a need to remain quiet and “virtuous,” as there had been during the homophile movement. This shift in principles and how to approach gay rights has endured through the 21st century, and can be completely attributed to…

    • 1495 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The first is that they urge Gay businessmen to step forward and open gay bars that will be run legally with competitive pricing and a healthy social atmosphere. Making sure that these bars are legal and healthy will stop the suspicion of these places being associated with violations. The second thing that the community encourages is that Homosexual men and women boycott places like the Stonewall. This will help get the criminal elements out of gay bars by simply making it unprofitable for them. Lastly, Homosexual citizens of New York City, and concerned Heterosexuals should write to mayor Lindsay demanding a thorough investigation and effective action to correct this intolerable situation that occurred.…

    • 477 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In the 1970s, if you were someone who was interested in the same sex as yourself, you could understand the day by day difficulties of being accepted by society because this was not considered proper. The general views of Americans were very different from the views of Harvey Milk at this time. The actions that Harvey Milk took towards gay rights stood out. In the Mid-1970s, Harvey Milk worked to promote gay rights and for everyone to be equal. Milk was successful in making a change by being the first openly gay man elected into public office and influenced many gays and gay supporters.…

    • 1404 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    About 49 years ago, Marsha Johnson, an African American transgender female, responsible for a rights movement in the U.S. for the LGBT+ community. The Stonewall Riots, which was when police were targeting a gay inn and the cross dressers and LGBT+ members within. The spark of change was fanned until it grew into a flame which continues to burn today. In America, thought there is more tolerance than back then, the LGBT+ faces injustice everyday. According to Congress, the Marriage Equality Act was not passed until 2015 even though there had been a push for years that was left denied because it was riding off the decisions of straight white men in power, who this would never concern.…

    • 1248 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In the United States history, it is taken to be discriminated against for being “different”. One group in particular was, and always has been discriminated against being lesbians, gays, bisexuals and transgendered people known as, LGBT, have fought for equal rights since the 1950s. With many Americans frowning upon the LGBT lifestyle in this time period, it is keen to knowing that soon enough, the LGBT community would take action. On June 28th, 1969 in Greenwich Village in Manhattan, one of the most memorable moments in LGBT history took place. Stonewall, a popular gay bar was raided with police forces that quickly escalated and exponentially resulted in Stonewall patrons of all gender identities and sexual orientations to begin forceful attacks against the New York City Police in order to prove that they are people who deserve to be treated equally.…

    • 1520 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In some historical cities homosexual behavior became a part of public life while other cities sought to criminalize the behavior (Aldrich, 2004). The development of communities offering support and subcultures providing connections are recorded in America during the Harlem Renaissance after World War 1. During World War 2 American’s witnessed the bluntness of the “Don’t tell, don’t ask” policy utilized by the military. This policy allowed gay men an opportunity to defend America, yet even during service faced discriminatory statements and actions. New movements seek to acknowledge individuals who fought for a country while being persecuted through oral interviewing (Estes, 2005).…

    • 863 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The first one would be the sense of unity because when the riots first started to break out, crowds of people started to ban together and then other groups of people during the night or days after would come together with the others. As days of protesting and riots went on after Stonewall, the number of people increased and could be seen hand in hand as one giant wall. The second major concept to emerge was pride because for the first time, fighting back against decades of oppression was successful and can be looked at as the first achievement in the gay rights movement. It could have only emerged with crowds of people because it was very difficult for gay people to be publicly proud of who they are during this time because of society. Pride is now probably the leading idea in the gay rights movement.…

    • 2067 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays