The Stamp Act: The Change For Independence And Colonial Independence

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The atmosphere in the colonies before the stamp act had been slowly declining. The colonists were becoming frustrated with the policies that Britain was implementing, in terms of relations with the Native Americans, British expansion, and colony taxation. The Stamp Act was last straw for many colonists. After the passing of the Stamp Act, many colonists could no longer sit idly by, and had to do something. Although he Stamp Act was not the turning point, it created the conditions necessary for colonial unity in terms of boycotts that did make the movement for Independence unstoppable.
Relations between the Crown and the Colonies before the stamp act were already stressed. Between the positive relationship that Britain kept with the Native Americans,
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Nine of the 13 colonies sent delegates to the congress. This was the beginning of the united colonies. This is the starting of point of the United States. Before the Stamp Act Congress, the colonies had all been separate British colonies. At the congress, we see the beginning of the transformation to united colonies. The Stamp Act Congress worked for multiple days drafting the Declaration of rights and Grievances. This document outlined all the problems that colonies had with Britain specifically, that the colonists had no elected representative, and therefore could not have taxes levied upon them. This document, and many of the representative at the congress had no intentions for independence, just equality. The document was sent to Britain and quickly rejected. This rejection is what really spurs the actions that lead …show more content…
They feel that they are being taxed unfairly, and the Crown will not listen or consider their complaints. At this point the colonists see the only course of action is to make the Crown listen to them. They are able to do the by boycotting British good. In the beginning, many colonists did not boycott to gain independence, rather, they boycotted to be heard. Had Britain taken notice of the boycotts, and given the colonists the representation they wanted, it is very likely that the American Revolution would have never taken place, or at least not when it did. On the contrary though, Britain did not grant the colonists direct representation, even though they did repeal almost all of the acts. During this period of boycotting, colonists begin to unite. No longer, is it just the elites who are making decisions, but everyone who has a voice. Now, non-landowners, and women can make decisions regarding British policies. This is what brings the common people to the independence movement. Along with the sense of power, colonists are now building bonds with each other through suffering. The Boston was the first real showing of colonial unity against Britain. At this point, there was nothing that could be done to stop the colonial movement for

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