The Pros And Cons Of HIV/AIDS

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Since the first cases were reported in 1981, AIDS has been affecting the lives of many people in the United States. Perceptions of HIV/AIDS have change dramatically over the pass of the years. Contracting the HIV virus meant a death sentence, however with medical improvements and the introduction of more efficient drugs a person with HIV can in a way live a normal life. And because of the advances in medicine people infected with HIV are living longer. Nevertheless, after a person gets infected with the HIV it is very likely for he or she to die of AIDS and AIDS still an incurable disease. In 2009 there was an estimate of 1.2 million people living with HIV/AIDS, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention but researchers argue …show more content…
Both African-Americans (men and women) and Hispanic are considered to have the most number of new HIV infections every year. In a researched done by the American Public Health Association, it was found that “approximately 65% of new HIV infections in the United States occur in non-white population.” It is important to mention that there certain behaviors that increases the risk of contracting HIV/AIDS, however, On an article published by the American Journal of Public Health, Geographic Should Not Be Destiny: Focusing HIV/AIDS Implementation Research and Programs on Microepidemics in US Neighborhoods, researches showed that Hispanics and African-Americans are less frequent to engage in high HIV risk behaviors but still are the population most affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic. …show more content…
Since its outbreak, media covAIDS at 21: Media Coverage of the HIV Epidemic 1981-2002 also finds that specific populations disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS in the U.S., such as gay men, teenagers and young adults, minorities, and women, were the focus of only a small amount of the news coverage rage about HIV/AIDS had been reduced to a point where is almost not mentioned at all” the problem of little coverage of the disease among minorities, increase the lack of knowledge about HIV transmission among a the minority U.S population.

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