Advantages And Disadvantages Of Dna In Criminal Investigation

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Forensic DNA is the process of using and collecting DNA from crime scenes to solve criminal investigations and to ensure accuracy and fairness in the Criminal Justice System. DNA profiling has grown significantly in the past years and has been extremely useful in identifying suspects, criminals and other people involved in the crime. If the suspect is unidentifiable, DNA evidence is compared to a DNA database to identify the criminal. DNA testing has both advantages and disadvantages many of which relate to ethical, emotional, economic and practicality issues. Research states that an increasing number of criminal investigations have used DNA testing to successfully identify the perpetrator.
Serious issues, both positive and negative, arise
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As DNA profiling technology advances, DNA evidence is being resubmitted from crimes that were committed years ago and a comprehensive test is conducted to find the potential suspect. Although identifying the perpetrator of the crime may be successful, DNA will have to be taken from other family members. This can cause private information about an individual’s ethnic background or parentage to be available to involved personnel’s which could lead to discrimination. Inaccurate results from DNA evidence has the possibility to put an innocent person to jail. Despite this, small samples are sent to multiple independent labs, which helps to reduce the possibility of an error which affect the final results. As DNA evidence is being passed through multiple labs, the individual’s private DNA information has the potential to be used in different crimes. However, it is stated in an article on “Forensic Databases: benefits and ethical and social costs” that, “Public support has been presumed on the grounds that all law-abiding people want criminals to be caught and convicted and the ‘innocent’ have nothing to fear from DNA technology.” (Forensic Databases: benefits and ethical and social costs, British Medical Bulletin, 2015). It is clear that most of society demands for criminals to be found and people who are deemed not guilty should have nothing to worry …show more content…
(DNA forensics, DNA forensics, 2015). To further improve this system the level of privacy of the DNA profiles on the database should be increased and the number of years in which a DNA profile is kept on the database should be limited to 3-5 years, to ensure that this information is used for criminal investigation only. (Is it ethical to have a National DNA database? YourGenome, 2015) and (Pros and Cons of DNA Profiling, Bright Hub, 2012). The technology involved in DNA testing should also be kept up-to-date to avoid contamination and inaccurate results in identifying the criminal. (How DNA Evidence Works, howstuffworks, 2015). Overall DNA testing should be used to solve criminal investigations, with minor changes to the system, our forensic scientists and other personnel involved in the investigation will obtain accurate results and the worst criminals in our societies will be convicted, making this earth a safer

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