Evidence Interpretation

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Evidence Interpretation Over the years, there have been several cases that have been resolved with a false guilty plea or cases where a guilty party was not convicted of a crime. There are various elements that play a role in solving cases; evidence is a one of these key elements. Many factors can determine if the evidence submitted before a court of law is accurate such as how the evidence is collected, if proper protocell was followed before the laboratory’s handling of the evidence, and if the evidences was accurately processed by the crime scene laboratory by various forensic scientists. Furthermore, with the advances in technology in today’s society, various pieces of evidence such a DNA analysis have been considered a crucial element …show more content…
It can play a role in reconstruction of a criminal crime scene as well link physical and biological evidence between a victim and the suspect(s) (Fish, Miller, Braswell, & Wallace Jr., 2014). The actions of the crime scene investigator are crucial at every crime scene. Upon arrival, the crime scene investigator (CSI) is the individual who scopes the crime scene for evidence pertaining to the crime scene as well as collects all evidence to the best of their ability. Furthermore, the crime scene investigator must transport all evidence to the laboratory to be tested by the proper forensic scientist. The job of not only the crime scene investigator, but also the forensic scientists at the laboratory, play a very important role in solving criminal cases. It only takes one simple error when handling evidence to convict an innocent person or find a guilty individual …show more content…
With lacking evidence, detectives and prosecutors choose the most likely suspect, however; this is not always liable as from time to time, the individual in question is not guilty. There have been cases over the years where innocent defendants are coerced into confession during questioning; confession evidence can be quite compelling in front of the judge and jury (Braithwaite, 2012). Furthermore, individuals who are innocent and being prosecuted for a crime can be convinced that there is enough substantial evidence to prove their guilt, even when there is little to no substantial evidence in the case to start with. They are pushed to believe they would not make it through trial and receive an innocent verdict, often times causing blameless persons to accept a plea-bargain (Gilchrist, 2011). Unfortunately, there is substantial evidence proving that more guiltless individuals are imprisoned due to accepting a plea bargain than taking the case to trail and demanding their innocence (Gilchrist,

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