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    What are the benefits of forensic science? Why is the application of forensic science in courtrooms beneficial? Can forensic science further lead to less cases where innocent people are put into prison for something they did not commit? It is said that "Since 1989, there have been tens of thousands of cases where prime suspects were identified and pursued—until DNA testing proved that they were wrongly accused" (Innocence Project, 2016). It is time, at last, to speak the truth about forensic science, and the truth is this. Forensic science is a reliable source for acquitting the wrongfully accused thus making its application a major benefit in courtrooms. To begin with, the use of forensic science in courtrooms is a major benefit due to the fact that its application can lead to less individuals in prison for something they did not commit. One of the many cases where an individual had been sent to prison for something they did not commit and later were found innocent is the case of Larry Fisher. This individual spent 23 years in prison when "DNA evidence proved that he, not David Milgaard, raped and murdered Gail Miller, a Saskatoon nursing assistant, in 1969" (Robertson, 2015). This is one of the cases where forensic science and its application led to an individual 's freedom after spending his early adulthood in prison for a crime he did not commit. This case proves that forensic science can go a long way in making sure less people go to prison for something they did not…

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    Frye Case Study

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    This use of the Frye standard determines if the evidence or scientific testimony is generally acceptable in the scientific community. The Frye standard was used to prove that the peoples motion to use the scientific testimony for the lab tests conducted from the samples taking from the defendants watch was not admissible because of the unaccepted methods used by the scientists who had conducted the Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid test. This use of the Frye standard in the court case allowed the…

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    Forensic DNA is the process of using and collecting DNA from crime scenes to solve criminal investigations and to ensure accuracy and fairness in the Criminal Justice System. DNA profiling has grown significantly in the past years and has been extremely useful in identifying suspects, criminals and other people involved in the crime. If the suspect is unidentifiable, DNA evidence is compared to a DNA database to identify the criminal. DNA testing has both advantages and disadvantages many of…

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    Dna Analysis Essay

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    It is common to hear reports in the media of crimes that have been solved with theassistance of DNA analysis (Brown, 2006). If enough blood, semen or tissue is foundat a crime scene, forensic laboratories can determine the blood type or tissue type byusing antibodies to detect specific cell surface proteins (Campbell et al, 2006). Thismethod unfortunately requires large amounts of fresh samples and is not a strongsource of evidence as several people have the same blood or tissue type and thus…

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    Forensic Genetics To understand what Forensic Genetics is you first have to know what each term means. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary (2015) states that Forensics is the application of scientific knowledge and/or methods to legal problems and in solving crimes. Forensics is used in many different ways, from identify people through DNA or fingerprints to examining hair and different substances. It has been around for a long time, with some methods dating back to the 13th century (Kennedy 2013).…

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    were ever reported. For as long as the samples are given to outside researchers and freezer containing the samples is not locked the opportunity still exist. The reason why state departments of health are not concerned about privacy breaches or locks on freezes containing the DNA samples is because of the creation of the Newborn Screening Translational Research Network. This is a national repository or storehouse of newborn DNA. Currently, California, Iowa, Michigan and New York share a…

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    With the onset of television shows like CSI and NCIS, people have their own views of how the Criminal Justice System uses and obtains forensic evidence. One of the main issues with the media influence today is how people assume that forensics in the real world is exactly like the shows that portray it. “If people’s reactions to crime and criminals are generally shaped by the mass media, then it seems reasonable to assume that public reactions to criminal cases are shaped by shows like CSI”…

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    Blachander, N., N. Babu, Sudha Jimson, C. Priyadharsini, and K. M. K. Masthan. "Evolution of Forensic Odontology: An Overview." Journal of Pharmacy and Bioallied Sciences (n.d.): 1-13. 31 Oct. 2014. Web. 10 Sept. 2016. N. Balachander, N. Aravindha Babu, Sudha Jimson, C. Priyadharsini, and K. M. K. Masthan wrote their article “Evolution of forensic odontology: An overview” about real life examples of how deceased are identified by their DNA. They really emphasized on identifying people by their…

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    Today, DNA profiling is well used all over the world. DNA profiling was developed by the geneticist of the Leicester University in 1985. DNA profiling is the process where a specific DNA pattern, called a profile, is obtained from a person or sample of bodily tissue (“DNA profiling Biotech Learning Hub”). By learning DNA profiling, it enable us to identify individuals. It is really common to use DNA profiling now and a lot of people starts to use the technology. While supporters of using DNA…

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    DNA testing which can also be label as DNA fingerprinting, DNA profiling and even DNA typing is considered a forensic technique that can be used to identify a person by their characteristics of their DNA. (What is DNA Testing?, 2016). DNA testing was developed in 1985, to identify a suspect and placed that initial suspect at the incident location during the time of the crime. DNA testing have evolve in the past decade that is can be used to study the animal populations. DNA testing can collected…

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