The Legacy Of Andrew Jackson

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Andrew Jackson was undoubtedly one of the most influential and respected men of his era, encompassing the year’s 1815-1845. A man who grew from nothing, and eventually worked his way up the political food chain to become the president of the United States, as well as many other important positions. Serving as a Major General in the War of 1812, he was known as a war hero after the Battle of New Orleans. As the Era of Good Feelings faded out of sight with collapse of the Federalist Party, the democratic-republican Jackson developed the Democratic Party and a new political party system in the United States. He made a name for the Democratic Party as the first democrat in office, serving for two terms from 1829-1837. Jackson 's desire for small …show more content…
The book "Liberty and Power" by Harry Watson claimed the victory "put America on the Very pinnacle of fame"(Watson,78). His successes as a General did not go unheard by the public in the media, and Jackson was "immediately mentioned for the Presidency"(Watson, 78). Investing most of his time in military action in the war of 1812, Jackson lacked the knowledge of competitors for office, and had no standing as a civilian statesman. Yet, the public 's attention was caught by the general and Jackson and his managers began to "gather endorsements from public meetings and state conventions throughout the Union"(Watson,79). With the exception of serving on the U.S Representatives in 1796, this national publicity sparked the true beginning of Jackson 's political career, and a new future for the United …show more content…
It was an extremely controversial issue between white political ideals, and the constitutional rights of the Indian people. During Jackson 's Presidency, the Removal Act was signed, but when Van Buren took office in 1838, Jackson 's policy was acted upon. Indians were forcibly removed from their homes and forced to march twelve hundred miles to the land they were promised. By 1840, the ideals held by white men continued and they slowly began to conquer more western territory. Following Jackson 's death, President James Polk continued westward expansion into war with Mexico, an ordeal that Jackson would have supported. As new territory was conquered, a new question about the issue of slavery emerged without Jackson there to regulate. Throughout his Presidency, Jackson remained indifferent to slavery, as a slaveholder himself. The Compromise of 1850, which led to the abolishment of slave trade in Washington and California as a free state, was the last effort of Congressmen who had worked with Jackson. As the issues of slavery intensified, the age of Jackson faded

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