Lack Of Democracy In The Middle East

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In the midst of modern history (post World War II), the New World Order discomposed the old world order and browbeat the term conquest and territorial aggrandizement into the closet; however, the Middle East seems to be the exception to every rule. Over the past sixty years , armed hostile conflict and unrepentant governments have raged unchecked throughout the Middle East. Stability and peace are foreign words that do not translate in this region of the world. War ravaged Iran and Iraq in the 1980’s and the latter is currently in the midst of what seems to be endless occupation by the United States that threatens to turn into a civil war. In 1981, Israel attacked Iraq to end their aspirations of becoming a nuclear power. Now, the Jewish …show more content…
The citizens of Iran, Iraq, and Israel are victims of their government’s inability to establish peace and stability in the region. The United States’ answer to why peace is not a viable outcome in the Middle East is the lack of democracy in the countries that have the most influence. On the surface that may seem like a legitimate reason but the United States’ understanding of the cultural differences in the Middle East is apparent with the debacle in Iraq. Democracy is not the solution in the Middle East; the concept would just not work under the current self-aggrandizing leadership. The invasion of Iraq has only strengthened the ethnic divide and fostered the notion that the country can only survive if it splits into three ethnic regions. Although, the situation in Iraq has not reached the point of no return, the clock is steadily ticking away. The survival of Iraq as an independent and self-reliant country hinges on the population. A united Iraq will overcome the internal obstacles and allow the coalition to bow out gracefully. The U.S.’s inability to understand the history and culture of Iraq has created multiple problems that seem to be getting worse. The Iraqi government must publicly ask the U.S. to establish a timetable for departure. The effects of such a statement will help build up the credibility of the new government. This will allow them to begin overcoming their internal problems and at the same time reduce the external factors that are standing in the way of stability and peace. The U.S. must accept the fact that democracy may not be the best solution to the problem in Iraq. Even if the U.S. departs Iraq, they still face their scrupulous neighbors to the east. The biggest obstacle to peace between Iran and Iraq, other than the U.S., is the Shia majority in both countries. Iran is trying to influence the majority in Iraq to prevent stability and the

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