Case Study Of Brown V. Board Of Education

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All people regardless of color, race, or religion deserve to be equally protected under the law. Not only do they have the right to be protected but they have the right to have an equal opportunity to thrive. Brown went against the Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas because he believed that his daughter and other colored children deserved quality education and because he lived by a white school, however because of segregation his little girl had to travel a much further distance to a colored school and he saw this as an unfair scenario. Unfortunately children who would spend time traveling far distances to a colored school weren’t abnormal. Before the court decision was made, schools where segregated and it was legal so although people didn’t …show more content…
There was entire organization that helped people like him. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People or the NAACP attorneys filed a class action against the school district of Topeka, Kansas and amongst those lawsuits was Oliver Browns case. A white school prohibit his daughter from enrolling .The federal district court dismissed his case, saying that it was completely acceptable from the school to deny her enrollment because although she could not attend the school she could go to a colored school and still receive an education .Although the court dismissed his case he was persistent and took the case to the Supreme Court in 1953.Once it was there it was packaged with 4 other cases. He took his case to the Supreme Court because he believed that colored children like his daughter Linda deserved equal treatment when it came to their education so that they could have a brighter future. The case argued for equality and integration. Linda was only in elementary school and had to travel a mile because segregated schools where perfectly legal and unfortunately she could not attend the nearby school because it was an all-white school. It was unfair that she had to travel a lot more than other students because of her race. The case brought up the inequality that was taking place in schools and helped students receive equal education opportunities. Traveling oppressed others …show more content…
However, how would that ever be until the people where educated? According to Brown vs. Board of Education: Here 's what happened in 1954 courtroom by Herb Altschull “Warren said that when the 14th Amendment was enacted, "education of Negroes was almost nonexistent, and practically all of the race were illiterate. In fact, any education of Negroes was forbidden by law in some states." ” that is astonishing to hear, that at some point colored people could not be taught to read or write and how can an illiterate person ever fully thrive? This goes to show that before the law was passed to desegregate schools, there were very few to no options to colored people. Meaning that new opportunities where opened and so that people could reach their goals and dreams. Colored people could learn to read and write and move up the social latter. However not everything was bright and lovely once the case was approved. Altschull explained in his paper that some official where willing to close schools down instead of having them integrated and that is truly amazing .As officials they had to be looking for the best interest that benefit their people , but they weren 't. Today we now know that integration helped entire communities rise untogether and further fight for their

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