The Brown Vs. The Board Of Education Case

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9 to 0 The Brown vs. the Board of Education case challenged the racial segregation in public schools in Topeka, Kansas. After the Plessy vs. Ferguson case, the “separate-but-equal” doctrine accredited to racially segregated schools. Linda Brown, an African American third grader, had to walk a mile to her school when a white school was only blocks away. There were eighteen white schools to four black schools in her neighborhood. Topeka NAACP leader, McKinley Burnett, gathered plaintiffs for the class action suit, including the Browns. When claims were made to the federal district court stating that the schools were not created equal through racial segregation, the judge ruled that the schools were equal enough to qualify under the Plessy doctrine. …show more content…
Board of Education case, many schools still refused to integrate themselves. One in particular was Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. Daisy Bates, NAACP president in Little Rock, choose nine African American students to integrate Central High. These nine students are now known as the Little Rock Nine, which include: Elizabeth Eckford, Minnijean Brown, Gloria Ray, Terrance Roberts, Ernest Green, Thelma Mothershed, Jefferson Thomas, Melba Patillo, and Carlotta Walls. On September 4, 1957, crowds of protesters, white parents and students alike, ridiculed them and refused to let these nine students enter the school. Governor Orval Faubus of Arkansas even ordered the National Guard to prevent them from attending class. When word got out about the situation in Little Rock, President Dwight D. Eisenhower sent the federal troops to protect the students on September 25. They remained with them everyday for the rest of the school year. The following year, the Governor went on to closing down all public schools in Little Rock causing even more racial tension. It was then reopened in August …show more content…
Virginia, which segregated interstate transportation areas. It began in Washington, DC on May 4, 1961. The thirteen civil rights activists, seven black and six white, were headed towards New Orleans. Not until May 12 did they encounter violence, when some of the black men aboard tried to enter a “whites only” bathroom in Rock Hill, South Carolina. But that wasn 't the worst of it. On May 14 as they arrived in Anniston, Alabama, two hundred white men attacked the bus – slashing their tires and setting the bus on fire, then severely beating the members that came out. The police were of no help to stop the violence. As the media covered the incident, their message was being heard, but the violence grew. As no driver wanted to take part in the event, the freedom rides came to a halt, until Diane Nash, SNCC member, organized another freedom ride starting in Nashville, Tennessee; this time under police escort on May 20. However, this did not stop the

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