The Importance Of Nonverbal Communication In Intercultural Communication

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Nonverbal communication is very important in conversations between people. It is also very problematic, what can be observed by every person individually, when received message was misunderstood or taken not as the sender wanted it to be decoded. However, if nonverbal conversation is such a problem in regular contact between people, it can be assumed that intercultural communication may be even more problematic. Stella Ting-Toomey (1999: 114) in her book wrote that nonverbal communication in intercultural communication play various functions. She also mentioned that nonverbal communication may by intentional or unintentional. Also may have positive or negative impact on communication. Nonverbal signs very often reveal meaning which is very …show more content…
Toomey (1999) in her book gave example of Japanese people mark their identity by wearing specific uniforms they also show what kind of group they belong to. She pointed that students or people who work in business wear uniforms. Even those who are on holidays wear special kind of cloths to mark that they belong to this specific resort. What is called by the author as “identity badges” (1999: 118). Also East Asian way of expressing various emotions in public places is different from European. Toomey (1999) wrote in her book that: “(...) sounds of laughing moaning groaning yawning or belching in public, for instance, can be considered as acceptable(...)” (Toomey 1999: 118). What in European countries would be perceived as something rather inappropriate. In Japan smile may have more than just one meaning. Person who smile may be happy but also embarrassed or just would like to hide the fact that he or she strongly dislike something. In some casescases, smile may also represents anger (Toomey 1999: 121). As it was previously presented European people like expressing emotions during conversations on the contrary East Asians prefer to hide them and use very soft and low voice (Toomey 1999: 122). East Asian countries such as Japan Korea and China represent low-context cultures (Barnlund 1975, Hall 1976, Watson 1970, cited in Toomey 1999: 129). What means that they prefer to avoid eye contact during …show more content…
Fist stereotype which he mentioned and which can be observed in many movies many be using idioms by Japanese people in common everyday situations and spatially in business conversations. Some of them has been already adopted by English speaking countries, Chavez (2015) gave example of such idiom which is “The nail that stands up gets hammered down”. Another example of a still alive stereotype by Chavez (2015) is that Japan is a strict society. Chavez refuted that it is not society but country, which has strict rules and it is not to generalize and combine all people with one rule (Chavez, Rocket News 24, Nov. 28, 2015). Nikitina and Furuoka (2013) in their article collected and counted the most popular stereotypes about China and Chinese people. One of their results was that China is perceive as “world’s factory” and relation that all what comes from China has low quality and it is cheap (Nikitina and Furuoka, TRAMEZ 2013:187, 17(67/62)). Their long lasting rule of having just one baby was also mentioned, and it cannot be omitted, that China is a country mostly associated by others with Chinese fighting style: Kung Fu, Chinese actor Jackie Chan and Chinese food If it comes to Chinese people mayor features were small eyes (Nikitina and Furuoka, TRAMEZ 2013:187,

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