The Importance Of Hospitality In Japan

818 Words 4 Pages
Hospitality plays a major role in the international economy and in millions of peoples lives everyday. The industry provides countless jobs and opportunities to those who aspire to entertain and provide accommodation for others through hotels, restaurants, and events. The global impact of the travel and tourism industry in 2014 is roughly $2.36 trillion USD as a direct contribution, and $7.58 trillion as a total contribution (“Travel & Tourism”). Due to the hospitality industry having a relatively large factor in the economy, it is important for a country to have a sound industry to stimulate growth to keep the nation strong. No country does this better than Japan. Japan is known worldwide for their outstanding customer service and hospitality …show more content…
Hosts alter their appearance according to kata and omomuki by selecting the most appropriate dress, accessories, hair-styles, and cosmetics according to the time, place, and occassion (Nakamura and Gotoh). The manner in which the host makes themselves appear to their guests influences the formality of the situation and helps determine the appropriate interactions (Kaiser 337). Since Japan is a rather formal country and prefers to “reduce the unpredictability and emotional intensity of personal encounters,” the Japanese typically express themselves more nonverbally than verbally, thus the importance of yosooi (Witkowski and Wolfinbarger). The two main types of dress in the hospitality industry are the traditional and business attires. The customary kimonos are generally worn for special occasions or in hospitality operations, such as when waitressing (Hansen; Strand). Japanese business attire is similar for both males and females, consisting of dark, well-tailored suits with subtle, yet expensive, accessories. The manner in which it is worn has significance as well. “Wearing a suit and tie to meetings during the hot season sends a positive signal of respect, and keeping one’s jacket on in a non-air conditioned office signals even greater respect” (Gesteland 49). Due to Japan’s high formality, nonverbal communication often has a stronger impact than verbal communication. Simply …show more content…
In using kata and omomuki, the host prepares for the guest by carefully planning the decorations, invitations, entertainment, materials and food according to the specific season, place, and purpose (Blanchy; Nakamura and Gotoh). Decorations, for example, vary by season and are used to influence the mood. Cherry blossoms are used in the spring, while red maple leaves are preferred in the fall. The coldness of stones is incorporated in the summer, and the warmness of wood is used in the spring (Blanchy). The host generally follows kata by choosing the decorations based on the season, but omomuki is also utilized to make the event original. How the host prepares the restaurant, hotel, or event greatly influences the perception of the guest and contributes to the success of the motenashi

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