The Importance Of Evil In Salotto's Frankenstein

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“God did not create evil. Just as darkness is the absence of light, evil is the absence of God.” (Albert Einstein). This quote relates to Frankenstein because as the quote says: evil is the absence of God, Frankenstein plays God in the book, and leaving his creation is what turns it evil. The creature, at the beginning of his life, was an innocent being who just wanted someone to have as a friend and teach him how to survive. However, his creator abandoned him so he had no one to turn to. Having to deal with this and his first human interactions going terribly he is one that goes from innocent to evil exceedingly fast. He is judged quickly by his appearance and this is why people get scared of him and treat him terribly. He was never even …show more content…
This quote from a critique of Frankenstein, shows that Victor’s intentions in creating a being was to make it like himself, showing that he did not intend for the creature to be an evil killer. In Eleanor Salotto’s critique she comments more about Frankenstein’s intentions: “Frankenstein elucidates a story about the subject which does not correspond to Frankenstein’s intentions: the creature does not turn out as Frankenstein had envisioned him” (Salotto 190). From this quote readers can infer that if Frankenstein’s creation had turned out the way he had expected he would not have abandoned the creature, and there is a possibility that the creature would not have turned evil. This being said, the creature from the start of the book came alive not already the evil monster he turns into later in the novel. Even Frankenstein says towards the beginning of the book that Frankenstein was created with good intentions, and he wanted him to become something good: “I had desired it with an ardour that far exceeded moderation” (Shelley 35). The time and dedication that Frankenstein put into his creature was something that he intended to be perfect, he wanted him to be good and …show more content…
During these months the creature gained a great amount of intelligence, and from this intelligence sprang both good and bad. The good that came from this was his reading of Paradise Lost, Lives, and Sorrows of Werter. These books increased the creature’s knowledge of words, feelings, and understandings of the world, “I can hardly describe to you the effect of these books. They produced in me an infinity of new images and feelings.. I found in it a never-ending source of speculation and astonishment” (Shelley 91). From his new knowledge and understanding of the world around him he begins to question himself, since he realizes that he is different from the people living in the cabin: “What did this mean? Who was I? Whence did I come? What was my destination? These questions continually recurred, but I was unable to solve them” (Shelley 91). These questions made him think about his origin, it also made him think of why he was different from the all the people he had seen. None were like him, this made him curious and want to find answers. The books did not change him, they just started something that would eventually lead to him becoming something evil. The books did, however, fill him with knowledge that was before beyond his comprehension and gave him new ideas that he had never thought of before. The book that had the most effect on Frankenstein, because he could relate to it, was Paradise Lost: “Many times I considered Satan as the fitter

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