Psychoanalytic Criticism In Frankenstein's Frankenstein

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Psychoanalytic Theory is the theory of personality organization and the dynamics of personality development that guides psychoanalysis, which was first laid out by Sigmund Freud in the late 19th century. Applying this theory to literary text often gives one a more detailed examination of the minds of the text’s characters. “Frankenstein” is often read through a psychoanalytic lens, as there have been many articles, books, and dissertations written on the subject. The relationship between Frankenstein and his monster is troubled, and Freud’s theories regarding the Oedipus complex and the components of the human psyche help to understand why the characters are so troubled. Frankenstein created his monster with the Id and Oedipus Complex as his …show more content…
During the hunt for the monster, Frankenstein says, “Yet at the idea that the fiend should live and be triumphant, my rage and vengeance returned, and, like a mighty tide, overwhelmed every other feeling” (149). Frankenstein is giving into his rage, and is seeking vengeance, which are two strong components of the Id. Although the monster was created from Frankenstein’s selfish desires and was never accepted by him, it lets its Superego takeover by giving Frankenstein a chance at redemption despite his awful treatment of his monster. This was argued by Haidee Kotze in her article, “Desire, Gender, Power, Language: A Psychoanalytic Reading of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein,” stating: The dueling interpretations of Shelley’s novel reflect the complicated relationship—and grotesque intertwining—of man and monster. Yet since Frankenstein never accepts his monster, while his monster gives man an unbiased chance at redemption, the doctor makes his name as the man-monster, while his creature’s preferred path in life is that of a good- natured monster-man …show more content…
Frankenstein’s tragedy of the passing of his mother could have directly caused him to create the monster. After the death of his mother, Frankenstein leaves his family to die and creates a new life, with the Oedipus Complex as his motivator. Freud theorized in the Oedipus Complex that a male child will have a sense of rivalry with his father, because he does not want anyone to get in the way of his mother-son bond. Frankenstein’s mother died when he was young, and Frankenstein lived in agony because of this; her death was something that he never did overcome. One could theorize that Frankenstein was angry at the world because of his mother’s death, which would explain why he created a being capable of killing; he desired to take revenge on the world for taking away his mother-son bond. This complicates the relationship between Frankenstein and his monster, as he uses him not only as a way to seek revenge on his broken bond with his late mother, but also as a replacement for his

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