Literary Analysis: Frankenstein, By Mary Shelley

Better Essays
Crystal Gabun
Professor Morrow
English 105
October 20, 2014

Frankenstein Literary Analysis Over the past few centuries, scientists have made countless discoveries and advances. These developments stem from an individual’s innate curiosity and desire to further the realm of possibility through theory and experimentation. For many, the thirst for knowledge can grow so immense that one is willing to disregard the moral codes or ethical standards of society in order to push the bounds of modern science. In the novel, Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley, the unimaginable has been done; a living creature has been brought to life by the use of science. Victor Frankenstein, a brilliant and ambitious young scientist, feeds his obsession with life and
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Upon creating the monster, Frankenstein’s intention was to create a profound new species that “…would bless me as its creator and source; many happy and excellent natures would owe their being to me (Shelley 30.)” However, when Frankenstein brings the monster to life with the use of electricity and different body parts sewn together, he is immediately horrified at the “ugliness” of his work. In Victor’s eyes, the creation is not the embodiment of these ‘excellent natures’ at all and he is certainly not fond of the idea of being the reason for its creation. The creation’s “yellow skin scarcely covered the work of muscles and arteries beneath; his hair was of a lustrous black, and flowing; his teeth of pearly whiteness; but these luxuriances only formed a more horrid contrast with his watery eyes, that seemed almost of the same colour as the dun-white sockets in which they were set, his shriveled complexion and straight black lips” (Shelley 44). Unnaturally created, the monster lacks the beauty and, as the reader late finds out, also lacks the empathy of a human being. In the article, Frankenstein: A Feminist Critique of Science by Anne K. Mellor, the author emphasizes that Victor’s creation of the monster without the female counterpart of human reproduction destined the monster to be socially ostracized and miserable, “In trying to have a baby …show more content…
Prior to that fateful night, Victor led a seemingly normal life with a loving family and an innocent curiosity to science. After the creation of the monster, Frankenstein falls into a deep depression that he does not overcome. The monster’s existence acts as a punishment to Victor for meddling with life and death with science. The Monster becomes an endless interference and threat not only to Frankenstein, but also to the people that he loves: Frankenstein’s younger brother William is murdered at the hands of the Monster in vengeance with the Frankenstein family’s young servant, Justine Mortiz wrongfully accused and then executed for the murder. Victor tormented by the guilt and falls into a deep depression. Frankenstein battles illness throughout the story and the problems that riddle the rest of his life after the creation of Monster can be seen as a form of ‘God’s punishment’ for the ‘sin’ of Victor trying to play God and creating life of his own through an unnatural process. From an online source, Anaya M. Baker explains “the creation of Frankenstein 's monster is presented as an unsurpassed feat of scientific discovery, yet one which brings only sorrow, terror, and devastation to his maker. In a sense, the creation of the monster is a punishment inflicted upon Frankenstein for his unbridled pursuit of knowledge…these ambitions…of Frankenstein appear to be beyond the range of

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