The Theme Of Revenge In Frankenstein

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In her novel “Frankenstein”, Mary Shelley develops a story in which a human attempts to create life out of death, but instead creates his mortal enemy. After Victor Frankenstein creates this creature, he leaves it alone and hopes that it will perish. However, the creature gains consciousness of his surroundings, of his creator, and of the history of the world he was thrust into. As the creature began to gain consciousness and finds the letters that his creator had written about him, he came to terms with his unfortunate position on the planet. He then realized that none of this would have happened if it were not for Victor Frankenstein’s actions. After this, revenge becomes a pivotal theme in the novel, evidenced by both the actions of Victor …show more content…
To begin with, revenge is a clear aspect in the creature’s life. In volume 3, Victor Frankenstein agrees to create another creature to accompany the monster. However, Frankenstein begins to acknowledge the repercussions that his creation might entail, and therefore immediately destroys the creature. When the monster sees Frankenstein destroy his only wish, he vows to make his life a living hell. He promises “revenge remains – revenge, henceforth dearer than light or food! I may die, but first you, my tyrant and tormentor, shall curse the sun that gazes on your misery” (Shelley, 173). As he says this, it is evident that the monsters will make Frankenstein suffer due to all of the actions. Consequently, the events that took place afterward enforce his promise. First of all, the creature kills Henry Clerval, Frankenstein’s dear friend. It is apparent that the theme of revenge here is important for the development of the story since this motivation is what leads the creature …show more content…
It is plausible to say that Victor Frankenstein’s actions instilled in the creature the vengeance he so dearly seeks. However, after the creature commits some of these acts of retribution, a sense of revenge is also instilled in Frankenstein, perpetuating this never ending cycle of revenge in the story. Shortly after the creature’s murders, Frankenstein thinks “I was possessed by a maddening rage when I thought of him, and desired and ardently prayed that I might have him within my grasp to a great and signal revenge on his cursed head" (Shelley, 202). In this moment, Frankenstein is willing to do anything to find the creature and avenge all of its wrongdoings. Afterwards, Victor Frankenstein’s sole purpose in life becomes to get revenge for everyone that the creature has taken away from him. Therefore, it is conceivable that after this, Frankenstein has lost his humanity, just like the creature. By the end of the the story when Victor Frankenstein is on his death bed, he makes Walton promise that he will continue his revenge as he says “swear to me, Walton, that he shall not escape; that you will seek him and satisfy my vengeance in his death” (Shelley, 212). The prolongation of the theme of revenge in the story demonstrates how crucial it is for the novel. Even after Victor Frankenstein’s death, the theme will prevail by

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