The Importance Of Barriers To Learning Assessment

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Moving on, the “vision for children with SEN and disabilities is the same as for all children and young people - that they achieve well in their early years, at school and in college, and lead happy and fulfilled lives” (DfE, 2014). Nevertheless, this has received criticisms as Kalambouka et al (2007) state, there is “less agreement about whether this principle can be realised in practice, and even if it can, about what the impacts might be on the achievements of pupils with SEN” in mainstream schools. In their study, it has also been suggested that there were no “adverse effects on pupils without SEN”, with approximately “81% of the outcomes reporting positive or neutral effects”. However, selection bias is a potential concern because their …show more content…
The graduated approach identifies four steps of action - assess, plan, do and review (DfE, 2014). Most importantly, the DfE (2014) agrees that “all agencies should work together to fulfil the needs of SEN learners working together with teachers, parents and schools and any other local authority”. One question that needs to be asked, however, is whether the “quality of the teacher contributes more to learner achievement than any other factor, including class size, class composition, or background” as stated by Sanders and Horn (1998). Also, teachers spend time planning and teaching children so their role could be the most crucial component of inclusive practice, contributing to high progression made by a diverse range of pupils. Lastly, a differentiated curriculum for a range of pupils within mainstream education and the removal of barriers will help the SEN learner learn: examples being equipment and resources (The Children and Families Act, 2014). After this, lessons should be followed by regular assessments so that support is matched to …show more content…
Furthermore, teachers should keep desks clear, give colour organisers and use peer buddies if necessary. “Building this routine into the lesson can greatly enhance comprehension of students with learning disabilities” (Bender, 2008, pg. 53). In mainstream education teachers, should also be able to develop alternative assessment methods, because pupils with dyslexia might show a better understanding of a topic using an alternative means of demonstration than a pencil and paper such as intervention. Teachers need to support children with SEN in every lesson so this could be challenging as whole class teaching might be taking place rather than intervention. As a result, pupils with SEN cannot always have the teacher’s full attention unless there are teaching assistants available to carry out intervention whilst the remaining children are taught by the class teacher. In contrast, adapted strategies help to match the pupil’s needs to the activities which are set, increasing children’s self - confidence and improving the teacher/pupil

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