Essay On The Democratic-Republican Party

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Both the Democratic-Republican and Federalist parties had their own opinions and views, but overall the Democratic-Republicans had a more suiting view the overall atmosphere of the country at the time. The parties "The Federalists' downfall was owing primarily to their self-defeating political philosophy, to their ineptness as politicians, and their vindictiveness with which, in their hour of triumph, they used, their political enemies" (Miller 276). The fall of the Federalist party was beneficial when their views started becoming similar. Despite the fighting between the parties, it helped shape the United States for the years to come. The party was short-lived but necessary for the United States to grow and become more successful as a newly freed country.
The Federalist and Democratic-Republican parties were the first two political parties in the United States. The founder of the Federalists party was Alexander Hamilton. The Federalists believed in a more strong central government, while the Democratic-Republicans thought that a limited government was more
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He was adamant to pursue the Lewis and Clark Expedition because he wanted to know about the geography and landscape of the land and waterways. “They are the apogee of the American Enlightenment, cataloging and analyzing information and discoveries embracing geography, botany, zoology, astronomy, geology, ethnography, linguistics, and meteorology” (Schwarz 169). Even though many Federalists disagreed with the Lewis and Clark Expedition, the expedition still proceeded. Therefore, if Thomas Jefferson had not been elected into office, the United States would not have grown further west from the land he purchased for the United States. The Federalists would not have purchased the Louisiana territory since their main concern was that it would add to the large debt the country already had due to the Revolutionary

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